GCSE Geography AQA A water on the land: UK reservoir Rutland Water

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  • UK reservoir Rutland Water
    • About
      • The dam was built and Rutland Water was created in the 1970s
      • The reservoir covers 12 sq km and is filled with water from the River Wellend and the River Nene.
      • Rutland water was designed to supply the East Midlands with enough water to cope with rapid population growth in places such as Peterborough
      • Areas around the reservoir are used as a nature reserve and for recreation.
    • Economic impacts
      • The reservoir boosts the local economy as it is a popular tourist destination due to wildlife and recreation facilities.
      • Around 6 square km of land was flooded to create the reservoir. This includes farmland, so some farmers lost their livelihoods.
    • Social impacts
      • Lots of recreational activities take place on and around the reservoir e.g. sailing
      • Many jobs have been created to build and maintain the reservoir and to run the nature reserve and recreational activities.
      • 2 villages were demolished in order to make way for the reservoir.
      • Schools use the reservoir for educational visits.
    • Environment impacts
      • Rutland Water is a Site of Special Scientific Interest,SSSI where wildlife is protected.
      • Hundreds of bird species live around the reservoir including waterfowl which come there at winter.
      • A variety of habitats are found around the reservoir e.g marshes. This means a variety of different organisms live around the reservoir.
      • Ospreys have been reintroduced by the Rutland Osprey program at the reservoir.
    • Sustainability
      • The supply of water from the reservoir has to be sustainable to ensure people in the future have enough water.
      • To stay sustainable people can only use as much water as is replaced by the rivers supply.



Have my physical geography exam in 2 hours, very helpful, thanks :)

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