Scout - TKAM

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  • Scout
    • curious
      • Scout is curious and inquisitive but this inquisitive nature often gets the best of her
        • Scout name suites her position in the novel 'Scout' suggests looking for things and observing just as her character does
          • by making Scout inquisitive in cases the reader to question their own behaviour and question that of others
        • 'I wanted to ...see how she lived, who her friends were. I might as well have wanted to see the other side of the moon.'
          • Scout wants to see Calpurnia's way of life but Alexandra disproves
            • Alexandra doesn't want to go into the black neighbour hood
          • Scout creates a list to show her determination wanting to find out more about Calpurnia
          • the metaphor 'other side of the moon' shows how impossible Scout believes it is as the other side of the moon is never seen
          • also represents Scout's innocence as she doesn't understand why Aunt Alexandra doesn't want her to visit Cal
        • we find Scout often using question marks showing her inquisitive nature
    • tomboy
      • Scout is a tomboy who spends most of her time playing with boys
        • Scout diverges from the normal standards of Maycomb women and this isn't accepted by everyone
          • Scout's Aunt blames her behaviour on not have a feminine influence growing up
            • Scout however did have feminine influence - Calpurnia
              • 'Cal seemed glad to see me when I appeared in the kitchen, and by watching her I began to think there was some skill involved in being a girl'
                • the kitchen is a place where the women typically resides
                • it is not Alexandra who manages to convince Scout that being a girl requires skill but Calpurnia  proving the exact opposite of what Alexandra believes
              • Alexandra doesn't think Calpurnia can provide Scout with what she needs most likely because she is black
                • Later in the book Scout finally understands what being a lady means
                  • if Aunty could be a lady at a time like this, so could I
                    • It was to be helpful and kind in times of need
                    • Scout has grown as no longer looks at being a lady with disgust but has maturity to know she has remain civilised in this sad time (Tom's trial)
          • Jem likes the way Scout is an when she begins to become more lady like he gets annoyed
            • 'you're becoming more and more like a girl everyday'
              • he may not wish for this to happen as she is his playmate and he doesn't want her to be like all the other girls who are afraid to get dirty
                • however later in the book Jem wishes Scout to once again be a girl
                  • 'can't you take up sewing' or something'
                    • the shows the reader Jem has outgrown the days where he wants to play with Scout
                    • It shows us Jem is beginning to take a more traditional view of the world the more people he encounteres
    • two perspectives
      • Scout tells the story from 2 different perspectives
        • young scout
          • young scout gives us a naive perspective on the novel
            • a view that is not yet corrupted by adulthood and is refreshing in a book full of prejudice
        • old scout
          • older scout gives a bigger picture of the ongoings of the trial or Tom's death
            • Mr. Underwood didn't talk about miscarriages of justice, he was writing so children could understand.
              • we know this quote is older scout as she says 'so children' and at this time in the book she herself is a child
              • it gives an needed adult perspective so we can understand the things child scout will not
            • evidence from the very start that it is like a memoir
              • 'many years later Jem and  I would argue over what caused it all...'
    • learns about life
      • as the novel progresses Scout matures
        • she experiences many things a child her age wouldn't normally experience
          • ****, a trial and boo radley
        • an example of this is her treatment of Boo Radley
          • she begins by taunting him and gossiping about him
            • but then continues to be kind to him in the final chapter
              • Scout takes Atticus's advice and 'walks inside another person's shoes'
                • 'Just standing on the Radley porch was enough'
                  • the Radley porch is the place Scout was so terrified to go 3 years ago but now stands ready finally understanding Boo
                    • huge symbolism of her growth
    • not filtered
      • Scout has no filter when it comes to asking questions
        • She is also a child meaning she doesn't understand ordinary social constructs so she may ask these questions in innapproriatesituations
          • 'Atticus, what is ****?'
            • this question may be seen as highly inappropriate for a child of Scout's age to ask as she may not have the intelligence to understand it
            • However Atticus gives her a straight answer
              • Scout is a lot like Atticus as is inquisitive and intelligent
                • Atticus even says she will make a great lawyer
              • Calpurnia treats the question in a very different way saying a girl Scout age should know the answers to such a question
                • this makes it a representation of how Atticus teaches his children like adults
                  • may have been why Scout thinks it is ok to ask questions other child don't ask - grown up being treated like an adult
          • such as after Tom's trial
            • 'Atticus, what is ****?'
              • this question may be seen as highly inappropriate for a child of Scout's age to ask as she may not have the intelligence to understand it
              • However Atticus gives her a straight answer
                • Scout is a lot like Atticus as is inquisitive and intelligent
                  • Atticus even says she will make a great lawyer
                • Calpurnia treats the question in a very different way saying a girl Scout age should know the answers to such a question
                  • this makes it a representation of how Atticus teaches his children like adults
                    • may have been why Scout thinks it is ok to ask questions other child don't ask - grown up being treated like an adult
    • innocence
      • Scout's innocence is clear from the very beginning of the novel but really comes to light during Tom Robinson's trial
        • they step outside and begin to talk to Dulphus Raymond the well-known alcoholic of the town
          • he confides in them that he only pretends to drink so he doesn't have to deal with people judging him for having mixed race children
            • 'Why'd he tell us Atticus...' 'Because you're children and you can understand it'
              • Atticus demonstrateschild have a uncorrupted view of world as Scout does therefore they won't judge Dulphus Raymond
      • Scout as a symbol of innocence in the novel gives the reader a simpler view of the trial that is not clouded by the biases of adulthood

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