Biological Kingdoms

Description of the 5 kingdoms

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  • Created on: 04-05-08 12:30
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1. Definition of species: A group of closely related organisms which are capable
of interbreeding, and which are reproductively isolated from other groups of organisms the basic
unit of biological classification.
2. The 5 Kingdoms:
Kingdom Animalia
Multicellular eukaryotes with differentiated cells organised into specialised organs.
No cell walls or large vacuoles.
Cannot photosynthesise.
Heterotrophic, relying on other organisms for nutrition.
Most can move from place to place and have nervous coordination.
Includes phyla such as jellyfish, roundworms, arthropods and molluscs.
Kingdom Plantae
Multicellular eukaryotes with differentiated cells organised into specialised organs.
Cell walls contain cellulose.
Cells contain chloroplasts and large vacuoles.
Autorophic, making organic compounds by photosynthesis (except for a few parasites).
Includes mosses, liverworts, ferns, conifers and flowering plants.
Kingdom Fungi
Multicellular eukaryotes (although most do not have separate cells).
Most are made up of a network of threadlike strands, called multi nucleate hyphae.
Cell walls made of chitin, a mucopolysaccharide (similar to cellulose but with amino acids
attached).
Cannot photosynthesise.
Heterotrophic most absorb nutrients from decaying matter after extracellular digestion.
Includes moulds, yeasts and mushrooms.
Kingdom Protoctista
Multicellular and unicellular eukaryotes.
Basic body structure is relatively simple.
May either photosynthesise or feed on organic matter from another sources.
Includes singlecelled protozoa, such as Amoeba and Paramecium, and algae.
Kingdom Prokaryotae
Prokaryotic cells are very small, typically less than 10 micrometres across.
Cells have no distinct nucleus. The nucleic acid is in a single circular chromosome.
Cells do not have organelles such as mitochondria or chloroplasts.
May either photosynthesise or feed on organic matter from other sources.
Includes the bacteria and bluegreen bacteria (Cyanobacteria).

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