Textiles AQA 2015 exam

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What different types of weaves are there?
The different types of weaves are: Plain weave, Twill weave, Satin weave and crepe and Pile weave
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What are the properties of a Plain Weave?
It is the simplest; cheapest weave to produce. It has a plain surface; good background to print on. It has the maximum number of interlacing points; produces firm strong fabrics which look the same on both sides.
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What are some examples of plain weave fabrics?
Calico, Chiffon, Lawn, Poplin, Taffeta, Organdie, Flannel
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What are the properties of a Twill Weave?
Hardest wearing weave. It is more complicated; more expensive. Has a definite right and wrong side. It has an uneven surface; shows less dirt. There are fewer interlacing points; more likely to fray. More variations are possible with Twill weave
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What are some examples of twill weave fabrics?
Denim, Gabardine, Drill, Herringbone, Dog's tooth
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What are the properties of a Satin Weave?
Weft yarns are almost completely hidden by the warp yarns. Frays easily; few interlacing points. It has a right and a wrong side. Shiniest satins are made from filament yarns. The floats snag easily; not very hardwearing. Not many variations.
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What are some examples of satin weave fabrics?
Duchesse satin, Satin-back crepe, Heavy bridal satins, Lighter weight satins (lining and lingerie
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Characteristic of Pile Weave?
They have tufts or loops of yarns which stand up from the body of the fabric.
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What are some examples of pile weave fabrics?
Corduroy, towelling, velveteen.
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What are the properties of a Weft Knit?
It is considerably stretchy; easily distorted, especially when washed. It drapes softly; easily takes shape of the figure. Does not crease easily. Traps air; good insulator. It ladders easily if snagged. Distinct back and front.
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What are some examples of weft knit fabrics?
Single Jersey, Double Jersey, Rib knit, Silver knit, Jacquard knits.
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What are the properties of a Warp Knit?
Less stretchy than weft knit; produces firmer fabric. Fabrics do not ladder and cannot be unraveled. Bigger variety. It is faster than weft knitting and the cheapest method of fabric production using yarns.
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What are some examples of warp knit fabrics?
Tricots, Locknit fabrics, Knitted velour, Raschel knits, knitted lace fabrics.
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What are the three main methods of constructing non woven fabrics?
Felting. Needle felting. Bonding.
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What are some of the ways bonded fabrics are constructed?
Adhesive bonding. Solvent bonding; uses solvent to soften and fuse the fibres together. Thermal bonding; utilizes the thermoplastic properties of the chosen fibres to fuse the fibres together using heat and pressure. Stitching with thread.
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What are the properties/ features of non woven fabrics?
Made straight from fibres; cheap to manufacture. No grain; cheaper to use. Do not fray. Not as strong as woven or knitted fabrics. Do not drape as well as woven or knitted fabrics.
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What must be considered in regards to health and safety when choosing a fabric?
Do they burn or melt easily? consider for children and elderly nightclothes. Does it have protective properties useful to a job? Public furnishings must be flame retardant. Babies cannot have loose fibred clothes; may lodge in throat if put in mouth.
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What must be considered in regards to health and safety when choosing fastenings?
Is it designed for a child? if so, choking hazard. Small fingers; trapped in zips & buckles. Anything hanging off children's clothing; hazardous if caught in something. Small boys' trousers; no zips.
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What must be considered in regards to health and safety when designing around temperature?
A product may need padding for insulation against extreme heat; oven gloves.
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What must be considered in terms of health and safety when working with sharp edges?
Firm corners must be well padded. Wire can be dangerous if it works its way through the fabric. Textile products are checked for hazardous objects, e.g. broken needle parts, before leaving the factory.
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What are two examples of Natural Protein fibres?
Silk and Wool
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What are the properties of silk?
Warm, absorbent, good drape, insulating, lustre, lightweight, expensive, flammable, creases badly.
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What are the properties of wool?
Biodegradable, has overlapping scales, good insulator, flame retardant, easy care, lanolin makes the wool water and stain repellent.
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What are three examples of synthetic fibres?
Nylon, Polyester, Acrylic
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What are the properties of nylon?
It is lightweight, it has high strength, it has a high lustre, It has a low absorbency, it is easy to care for, it has a good drape.
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What are the properties of polyester?
It is non absorbent, it has a good drape, it has low warmth, it has a soft handle, it is easy to care for, it is durable, it can be recycled, it is crease resistant.
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What are the properties of acrylic
it is non absorbent, it is a good insulator, it is easy to care for, it has a good drape, it is durable, it is crease resistant, it is commonly used for jumpers and fleeces.
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What do synthetic fibres have in common?
They are all strong, they all have a good drape, they are all crease resistant.
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What are two examples of natural cellulose fibres?
Cotton and Linen
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What are the properties of cotton?
It is a staple fibre, it has a good absorbency; it takes dye well, it is easy to handle, it is a poor insulator, it has a good strength
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What are the properties of linen?
It creases badly, it has a slight lustre, it is cool and breathable, it is very absorbent, it is durable, it drapes well, it can be washed.
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What are 2 examples of regenerated fibres?
Acetate and Viscose
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What are the properties of viscose?
It is absorbent, it can be washed, it creases easily, it has a soft handle, it has low warmth, it drapes well,
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What are the properties of acetate?
It creases easily, it has a low absorbency, it drapes well, it is difficult to care for, it has a high lustre, it has a low strength.
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Why are fibres commonly blended together?
To reduce the cost of the fabric. To create various textures. To allow for novelty effects. To make a fabric with specific qualities. To make the fabric stronger. To make it easier to care for. To be more crease resistant. To allow it to be heat set
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How are fibres blended?
The fibres must be the same length so they can be mixed together before being spun into a yarn. Continuous filament yarns can be twisted together to make a multi filament yarn.
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What are some popular fibre blends?
Polyester and Cotton, Viscose and Nylon, Polyester, Wool, and Lycra, Cotton and Lycra, Linen and Polyester, Silk and Polyester, Silk and cotton, Acrylic and Polyester.
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Why is viscose commonly blended with other fibres?
It helps make the fabric more absorbent and soft to handle. Viscose is cheap to manufacture therefore can reduce the price of the fabric.
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Why is wool commonly blended with Nylon?
Wool makes the fabric soft and warm and the nylon gives improved improved strength and resistant to abrasion, as well as making the fabric lighter and to stop it from shrinking when washed. The nylon also reduces the cost.
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Why are Polyester and Cotton commonly blended?
The polyester helps cancel out the shrinking, creasing and slow drying of cotton. The cotton makes the fabric more absorbent and softer. This blend can be very dangerous as cotton is flammable ad polyester melts when exposed to extreme heat
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

What are the properties of a Plain Weave?

Back

It is the simplest; cheapest weave to produce. It has a plain surface; good background to print on. It has the maximum number of interlacing points; produces firm strong fabrics which look the same on both sides.

Card 3

Front

What are some examples of plain weave fabrics?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

What are the properties of a Twill Weave?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

What are some examples of twill weave fabrics?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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