Pharmacology lecture 11

What are the noradrenergic receptors?
alpha 1 and 2. Beta 1, 2 and 3
1 of 26
What type of receptors are alpha and beta? How fast are their responses?
G-protein coupled receptors. Slow (seconds)
2 of 26
What are the effects of stimulating alpha 1 receptors?
Pupils dilate / Airways in lungs dilate / HR increases / Blood vessels to limb muscles dilate / Blood vessels to visceral organs and skin constrict / Brain activity general alertness
3 of 26
What are the effects of stimulating alpha 2 receptors?
Inhibition of neurotransmitter release (presynaptic receptor)
4 of 26
What are the effects of stimulating beta 1,2 receptors?
Pupils dilate / airways in lungs dilate / HR increase and force / blood vessels to limb muscles dilate / blood vessels to visceral organs and skin constrict / brain activity general alertness
5 of 26
What are the effects of stimulating beta 3 receptors?
All same as b1/2, INCREASE lipolysis
6 of 26
What is the main effect of alpha 1?
Smooth muscle and vaso-constriction
7 of 26
What is the main effect of alpha 2?
Inhibition of neurotransmitter release
8 of 26
What is the main effect of beta 1?
Increase cardiac rate and force
9 of 26
What is the main effect of beta 2?
Bronchodilation
10 of 26
What is the main effect of beta 3?
Lipolysis and increased metabolism
11 of 26
Name a beta 1 agonist and what does it treat?
Dobutamine. Heart failure (Increases cardiac rate and force)
12 of 26
Name an alpha 2 agonist and how is it used?
Clonidine (inhibits NA release). Used for hypertension. Treat withdrawal symptoms
13 of 26
Name a beta 2 agonist and what does it treat?
Salbutamol (bronchodilation). Treat asthma
14 of 26
Name a beta 1,2 antagonist and how is it used?
Propranolol (decreases CO2 and O2 demand, bronchoconstriction) treat hypertension and angina
15 of 26
Name a beta 1 antagonist and how is it used?
Atenolol. Treat hypertension and angina
16 of 26
Name a beta 2 antagonist and how is it used?
Timolol (ciliary contraction, decreased intraocular pressure). Treat glaucoma
17 of 26
Name an alpha 1 antagonist and how is it used?
Prazosin (vasodilation and decreased vascular resistance). Treat hypertension
18 of 26
How does adrenaline have to be given to a patient? Why?
By injection (either subcutaneous or intramusic) because its destroyed in the gut.
19 of 26
What does an injection of adrenaline subcutaneously do?
Can prolong and isolate local anaesthetia
20 of 26
What does an injection of adrenaline intramusic do?
Treat anaphylactic shock
21 of 26
What receptor stimulates water electrolytes secretions?
alpha 1
22 of 26
What drug as the side effect: Xerostomia? and how?
Clonidine. Inhibits NA release
23 of 26
What drug disrupts storage of NA in synaptic vesicles?
Reserpine
24 of 26
What drug blocks monoamine oxidase (metabolises NA)?
Tranylcypramine
25 of 26
What drugs can block the re-uptake of NA and so prolong the action of NA?
Amphetamine, Reboxetine, Cocaine
26 of 26

Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

What type of receptors are alpha and beta? How fast are their responses?

Back

G-protein coupled receptors. Slow (seconds)

Card 3

Front

What are the effects of stimulating alpha 1 receptors?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

What are the effects of stimulating alpha 2 receptors?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

What are the effects of stimulating beta 1,2 receptors?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
View more cards

Comments

No comments have yet been made

Similar Biology resources:

See all Biology resources »See all Peripheral nervous system - drugs acting on the sympathetic nervous system resources »