AQA Geography A Unit 1 Coastal Zone Case Studies

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Maldives - case study
Rising sea levels
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Maldives - background info
Group of island inhabited by around 300,000 people, average height of islands is 1.5m above sea level, scientists think the islands will be completely submerged within 50-100 years
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Maldives - social impacts
Evacuation, increased emigration, overcrowdedness (congestion), loss of fish and soil (jobs), loss of tourism, loss of jobs/lower wages
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Maldives - economic/political impacts
Loss of tourism (28% of country's GDP), expensive to build flood barriers, gov't had to ask Japan to fund the 3m high sea wall protecting the capital, Male ($60m)
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Holderness collapse - case study
Cliff collapse
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Holderness collapse - background info
Average rate of erosion is about 1.8m per year, erosion causing cliff to collapse by making it unstable
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Holderness collapse - causes
Made of softer rock (boulder clay), naturally narrow beaches (less protection), powerful waves and prevailing wind
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Holderness collapse - social impacts
Homes at risk of collapse (Sue Earle), damage to infrastructure (roads), gas terminal at risk (provides 25% of Britain's gas supply)
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Holderness collapse - economic impacts
Property prices have had a dramatic decrease (people lose property/livelihood/investments), people at risk of losing jobs (seaside caravan park at Ulrome losing 10 pitches a year)
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Holderness collapse - environmental impacts
Some SSSIs (Sites of Special Scientific Interest) are threatened (eg. lagoons near Easington)
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Holderness management - case study
Coastal management
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Holderness management - background info
11.4km of Holderness coastline has been protected by hard engineering
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Holderness management - which techniques?
Sea walls, wooden groynes, rock armour, 2 rock groynes built at Mappleton in 1991 (cost £2m)
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Holderness management - impacts
Bays forming between protected areas, groynes protect local areas but cause more erosion further down the coast due to longshore drift and the prevailing wind
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Studland Bay - case study
Coastal habitat
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Studland Bay - background info
A bay in Dorset; an SSSI and nature reserve managed by the National Trust; there are beaches, dunes and heathland
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Studland Bay - habitat for...
Reptiles (adders), birds (Dartford warblers), fish (seahorses), plants (maram/lyme grass)
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Studland Bay - issues
Lots of people walk across the dunes causing erosion, lots of boats use it (anchors destroy seagrass where seahorses live), the heathland can be damaged by fires (fire in 2008 destroyed 6 acres of heathland)
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Studland Bay - solutions
Boardwalks used to guide people over the site while protecting the sand from erosion, strict rules for boat owners as seahorses are protected by law)
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

Group of island inhabited by around 300,000 people, average height of islands is 1.5m above sea level, scientists think the islands will be completely submerged within 50-100 years

Back

Maldives - background info

Card 3

Front

Evacuation, increased emigration, overcrowdedness (congestion), loss of fish and soil (jobs), loss of tourism, loss of jobs/lower wages

Back

Preview of the back of card 3

Card 4

Front

Loss of tourism (28% of country's GDP), expensive to build flood barriers, gov't had to ask Japan to fund the 3m high sea wall protecting the capital, Male ($60m)

Back

Preview of the back of card 4

Card 5

Front

Cliff collapse

Back

Preview of the back of card 5
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