Britain 1547-1603 (Edward VI, Mary I and Elizabeth I)

HideShow resource information

1547
l Death of Henry VIII - left a regency council in place for Edward (aged 10)
l Marquis of Hertford appointed Lord Protector (secured his own position as Duke of
 Somerset) - within weeks he had overthrown the regency council
l Royal Injunctions are issued to clergy for enforcement of religious practices
l Invasion of Scotland - this lead to a deterioration of England's relationship with 
France and the threat of war
l Somerset wanted to reassert the ancient claim of Edward I to suzerainty (feudal 
overlordship) on the Scottish throne and planned to defeat the Scots in battle, build
 and garrison forts and force the Scots into submission
l Defeated the Scots at the battle of Pinkie but could not afford to keep the garrisons
 on the Scottish boarder
l Somerset paid for this was by debasing the coinage which resulted in increasing
 inflationary pressures
l 'Act Dissolving Chantries and other Guilds' to pay for England's expensive foreign 
policy
l Destruction of religious images in London lead to widespread iconoclasm
l Injunctions issued which attacked features of popular Catholicism
l Historian Brigden suggested that roughly 20% of Londoners were Protestant by
 1547

1548
l Somerset establishes an Enclosure Commission which has lead some historians
 to view him as the 'Good Duke'
l Poor harvest and inflationary pressures lead to riots
1549
l Execution of Thomas Seymour for treason (inappropriate behaviour with the princess
 Elizabeth)
l First Book of Common Prayer issued - moderately Protestant, pleased no one
l Act of Uniformity passed which enforces the use of the Book of Common Prayer
l Inflationary pressures worsen
l Western Rebellion (The Prayer Book Rebellion) in Devon and Cornwall wanted a
 reversal of all the religious changes under Somerset and the restoration of Catholic
 practices such as the Latin Mass
l Kett's Rebellion in East Anglia was a result of social unrest and what historian 
Wood described as "a sense of class antagonism" - Historian MacCulloch stated
that their grievances were the resentment of local government officials and
landowners
l Fall of Somerset for his failure to successfully suppress the rebellions - powerful 
men had turned against him such as Cranmer, Warwick and Southampton
1550
l John Dudley, Earl of Warwick, is made President of the Council (Later Duke of 
Northumberland) - has been viewed as a ruthless and unscrupulous 'Bad Duke'
l English radical, John Hooper, wrote that the process of reform was hampered by
 uncooperative public opinion
l Stone alters were removed and replaced with wooden ones
1551
1552
l Execution of Somerset- his failure to suppress the 1549 rebellions had left him
 vulnerable
l Revised Book of Common Prayer is issued, written by Cranmer and more radically
 Protestant - rewriting of baptism and burial services, reform of the communion service, ban on 'popish vestments' and a restriction on church music
l Second Act of Uniformity passed which enforced the Second Book of Common
 Prayer
l New Treason Act made it treasonable to question royal supremacy or any Church 
doctrine
l Black Rubic proclamation stated that kneeling in Church was acceptable
l According to historian Haigh, only 32% of wills left money to their parish
l A Commission is established to investigate the revenue system (however it remains
 inadequate even throughout Elizabeth's reign)
1553
l 42 Articles of Religion compiled which defined the Edwardian Church of England
l Northumberland had brought to an end the wars with France and Scotland and
 ensured the French payment for the return of Boulogne
l Crown begins to confiscate Church Plate
l 'Devise' to place Lady Jane Grey on the Throne (this however was not certain to 
override the 1544 Succession Act
l Death of Edward VI (6th July)
l Mary 1 proclaimed Queen in London
l Cardinal Pole appointed papal legate to England
l In Leicestershire, the stone alter was immediately rebuilt and in Yorkshire masses
 immediately began again
l Edward's religious laws were repealed
l Deprivation of married clergy
1554
l Execution of Lady Jane Grey
l Mary's councillors wished her to marry Edward Courtenay, Earl of Devon
l Marriage between Mary and Philip of Spain - marriage treaty drawn up to allay fears
 that England would simply become a part of Spain (marriage was supported by adviser
 Renard and the Holy Roman Emperor
l Wyatt's Rebellion - planned 4 simultaneous risings but was forced to act prematurely
 so there was only a rising in Kent - Wyatt had a force of 3,000 men motivated by 
Xenophobia, decline in the local cloth industry and some were anxious about religious
 changes - Wyatt had come close to London and to success but was executed
1555
l Heresy Act passed which begins burnings (289 Protestants were executed including
 Latimer, Hooper and Cranmer)
l Harvest failure
l Election of anti-Spanish Pope Paul IV lead to hostility between Mary and the Papacy
l Mary's parliament debated the fate of Church lands which had been taken during
 Edward's reign
l War between France and Spain breaks out
1556
l Execution of Cranmer
l Harvest failure
1557
l Cardinal Pole's legatine commission is revoked by Pope Paul IV
l War against France
l Influenza Epidemic
1558
l Loss of Calais
l Continuation of influenza epidemic
l Death of Mary and accession of Elizabeth
l William Cecil appointed Principle Secretary
l A new Book of Rates was issued which Elizabeth would greatly benefit from 
1559
l Elizabeth's coronation
l Phillip II proposes marriage to Elizabeth
l Treaty of Cateau-Cambresus between France and Spain confirmed that France would retain Calais for 
eight years, after which it would be restored to the English, failing this France would pay
 500,000 crowns
l Act of Supremacy - heresy laws under Mary repealed, communion in both kinds
 reestablished, oath of supremacy to be taken by all clergymen, Queen called Supreme
 Governor
l Act of Uniformity - specified use of only the 1552 book of common prayer, non-attenders at church to be fined (but Elizabeth only really required outward uniformity)
l Mathew Parker appointed Archbishop of Canterbury
l Elizabeth reluctantly sends financial and eventually naval support to the Protestant
 'Lords of Congregation' in Scotland
l Royal injunctions were issued to restore a single form of worship - required local
 bishops to adopt a Protestant view
1560
l Treaty of Edinburgh brings peace between England and Scotland
1561
l MQS returns to Scotland after a long period in France
1562
l Outbreak of the French Wars of Religion
l Elizabeth reluctantly sends military support for French Huguenots
l Elizabeth falls seriously ill with smallpox - councillors feared civil war if she died 
because she had not named a successor, this increased the pressure on Elizabeth to marry and produce an heir
1563
l 39 Articles of Religion are issue which define the faith of the Elizabethan C of E -
 linked her church with doctrines associated with Calvin
l 'Foxe's Book of Martyrs' is published which is Protestant
l Elizabeth is again pressed to marry by Parliament
l Parliametn is called because Elizabeth wants money and because MPs wanted her to
 settle the issues of marriage and the succession which she felt were royal prerogative
1564
l Treaty of Troyes between England and France in which England are forced to
 accept unfavorable terms
1566
l Archbishop Parker's 'Advertisements' (a statement of intent) were issued, leading to
 Vestarian Controversy over clerical dress
l Elizabeth is again pressed to marry by Parliament
l The Pope forbids English Catholics from attending C of E services which led to an
 increase in the level of recusancy (non-attendance)
1567
l Mary Queen of Scots is forced to abdicate
l The Duke of Alba is in control of the Netherlands
1568
l Mary Queen of Scots flees from Scotland to England - the Council are divided on
 how to deal with her so she is placed under 'temporary' house arrest
l An English Catholic College is founded in Douai by William Allen
l There are clashes between the Spanish fleets and the English fleet under John
 Hawkins in San Juan de Ulua over the slave trade
l Elizabeth impounds (takes legal custody of) money carried by Spanish ships
 docking in England - the money had been borrowed by Spain to pay their troops in
 the Netherlands so technically Elizabeth was not stealing
l Marriage negotiations begin between Elizabeth and Henri, Duke of Anjou
1569
l Northern Rebellion
l According to historian Tillbrook, by 1569 many Catholics enjoyed their faith in
 private and only outwardly conformed
1570

 Assassination of the Scottish regent, the Earl of Moray
The Northern Rebellion is successfully suppressed
Elizabeth is excommunicated by Pope Pius V, technically releasing her Catholic
 subjects from allegiance to her 
The excommunication cause further deterioration in Anglo-Spanish relations
1571
l Ridolfi Plot to assassinate Elizabeth
l Cecil is created Lord Burghley
l Parliament called to strengthen treason laws and laws against Catholics in light of
 Elizabeth's excommunication, Elizabeth also wanted money to pay for the
 suppression of the Northern Rebellion
1572
l Cecil is appointed Lord Treasurer
l The Massacre of St Bartholomew temporarily weakens relations between the
 English and the French
l The Treaty of Blois between England and France improved their relationship and
 formed (according to historian John Guy) a 'defensive league' against Spain and
 France withdrew their support for MQS's claim to the English throne
l Field and Wilcox (influenced by Dr. Cartwright) began their campaign to reform
 the English Church with their Admonitions to Parliament which attacked Catholic
 traces remaining in the Church 
1573
l Sir Francis Walsingham is appointed Principal Secretary
1574
l The first Catholic Priests trained at William Allen's college in Douai arrive in
 England
1575
l Edmund Grindal is appointed Archbishop of Canterbury - he was a staunch 
Calvinist 
1576
1577
l Grindal refuses the Queen's orders to suppress Prophesyings which leads to his
 suspension
l Execution of seminary priest Cuthbert Mayne
1578
1579
l Marriage negotiations take place between Elizabeth and the Duke of Alencon
1580
l The firth Jesuit missionaries arrive in England
1581
l The 'Act to Retain Her Majesty's Subjects in their Due Obedience' declares that
 anyone withdrawing subjects from obedience is a traitor
l Execution of the Jesuit Priest Edmund Campion
1582
1583
l The Throckmorton Plot
l Whitgift is appointed Archbishop of Canterbury
l Whitgift publishes Articles enforcing conformity and obedience from the clergy
1584
l Turner introduced a Bill for the establishment of a Genevan prayer book and 
Presbyterian system of Church government (known as the 'Bill and Book')which
 was refused
1585
l The Parry Plot
l The 'Act against Jesuits and Seminary Priests' is passed
l England's war against Spain begins
1586
l The Babington Plot
l MQS is tried and convicted of involvement in the Babington Plot
1587
l Cope attempts to reintroduce Turner's Bill of 1584, which had more support than
previously, but was still not read and Turner was sent to the Tower for his actions
l Successful attack by the English on a Spanish fleet at Cadiz
l MQS is executed 
1588
l England defeats the Spanish Armada
l Death of the Earl of Leicester
l Publication of first 'Martin Marprelate' tracts
1589
1590
l Death of Walsingham
1591
l Death of Hatton
l Robert Cecil promoted to Privy Council
1592
1593
l Act against Seditious Sectaries
l Execution of Barrow, Greenwood and Penry
1594
l First of a series of poor harvests
l Start of the Tyrone Rebellion in Ireland
1595
1596
l Worst harvest of the century
l Robert Cecil is appointed Secretary of State
1597
l A Poor Law is passed 
l Successive harvest failures lead to dearth (famine)
l Parliamentary agitation over monopolies
1598
l Death of Lord Burghley
l Defeat of Bagenal at the Battle of Yellow Ford
1599
l The Earl of Essex returns from Ireland
l Robert Cecil is appointed Master of Wards
1600
1601
l A revised Poor Law is passed
l Rebellion and execution of the Earl of Essex
1602
1603
l Death of Elizabeth who is succeeded by James VI of Scotland
1604
l England's war against Spain ends

Comments

No comments have yet been made

Similar History resources:

See all History resources »See all British monarchy - Tudors and Stuarts resources »