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REVISION NOTES: PHYSICS 3
UNIT 1: MOMENTS



Turning Effects

Trying to unscrew a nut requires a spanner. It is common knowledge that a longer spanner makes it
easier ­ this is because less force is required to pull the nut out. Unscrewing a nut is an example of a
turning…

Page 2

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REVISION NOTES: PHYSICS 3
UNIT 1: MOMENTS






A hanging object rests with its centre of mass directly below the point of suspension. This means that
the object is said to be in equilibrium. Because the centre of mass is directly below the point of
suspension, no turning effect is exerted…

Page 3

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REVISION NOTES: PHYSICS 3
UNIT 1: MOMENTS






Stability

Objects have a certain amount of stability, where they can withstand a certain amount of tilting
before they topple over. The diagram below shows three stages of a brick's tilt:






If you tilt the brick slightly (diagram a) and then release it,…

Page 4

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REVISION NOTES: PHYSICS 3
UNIT 1: MOMENTS





Circular Motion

An object attached to a piece of string, or similar material, when whirled round, will move in a
circular direction in the air. A good example of this is the hammer throw. The arrows on the image
below show this example…

Page 5

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REVISION NOTES: PHYSICS 3
UNIT 1: MOMENTS







Gravitational Forces

Any two objects exert a gravitational force on each other. Isaac Newton discovered gravity, and
he said that the force of gravity between any two objects:
is an attractive force
gets bigger with the mass of each object
gets smaller with…

Page 6

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REVISION NOTES: PHYSICS 3
UNIT 1: MOMENTS







Planetary Orbiting

The Moon orbits the Earth in a circular orbit, and the Earth, along with the other planets, orbits the
Sun in a slightly squashed circle ­ an elliptical orbit. In each case, an object orbits an object far
larger than itself…

Page 7

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REVISION NOTES: PHYSICS 3
UNIT 1: MOMENTS



environmental observations. These are much lower orbits ­ purely so that we can see as
much detail of the Earth as possible. One period of these satellites takes between two or
three hours, and their orbits go past both the Poles, so they…

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