MMBFD #2 Threats Resulting From Alternatives to Marriage and Conventional Marriages (A. Marriage Rates)

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  • Threats Resulting From Alternatives to Marriage and Conventional  Marriages                          (A. Marriage Rates)
    • There are ethnic variations in marriage - Berthoud (200) suggests that three quarters of Pakistani and Bangladeshi women are married by the age of 25, compared with just over half of White women.
    • Chester (1985)
      • Among those who noted that marriage rates had declines in many western countries, for example, Sweden and Denmark were first to see a decline, closely followed by Britain, USA, and Germany in the 1970's.
      • The annual numbers of marriages in England and Wales then went into decline despite a slight revival in marriage in 2004 when 273,000 couples got married, and it reached an all time low in 2005 when only 244,710 couples tied the knot.
      • This had continued well into the year 2000.
    • The Office for National Statics (2007) concludes that marriage is good for health and the married people live longer that single of divorced couples.
    • However Chester did not see these sort of figures as conclusive evidence for the decline in the popularity of marriage but rather a delay in getting married.
    • Some commentators are keen to point out that most people to get married at some point in their lives.
    • Although the marriage rate has declined, much of the decline does seem to be due to people delaying marriages rather than never getting married.
    • This was significantly less than in 1990-1994 when 87.2% of men and 93.7% or woman had married.
    • In 2008 the average age for first marriage was 32.1 for men and 29.9 for women.
    • According to British Government Statistics, in 1961 the average ages at first marriage in the UK was 25,4 years for men and 25.2 years for women.
    • In 2000 the average age of a first marriage for men was 30.5 and 28.2 for women.
    • Recent figures show a further increase in the proportion who have never married.
    • Beaujouran and Bhrolchain (2011) shows that 84.2% of women had married by the age of 40.
    • This would indicate a delay in the timing of marriage however, it does not necessarily indicate a reduction in the proportion of partnerships, since people may cohabit without getting married.
  • Chester (1985)
    • Among those who noted that marriage rates had declines in many western countries, for example, Sweden and Denmark were first to see a decline, closely followed by Britain, USA, and Germany in the 1970's.
    • The annual numbers of marriages in England and Wales then went into decline despite a slight revival in marriage in 2004 when 273,000 couples got married, and it reached an all time low in 2005 when only 244,710 couples tied the knot.
    • This had continued well into the year 2000.

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