LCW How and why have conservatives supported one nation principles 15 marks

  • Created by: lcatham
  • Created on: 11-05-18 20:34
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  • Provides the justification for limited social and economical intervention.
    • Mainly in the form of a qualified case for welfare provision.
    • Key principles include paternalism, social duty as the price of privilege, moral responsibility and social cohesion within an organic society.
    • How and why have conservatives supported One Nation principles? (15 marks)
      • Their application in the form of social reform and welfare serves are in the long term interests of the wealthy and privileged.
        • Helps to neutralise political discontent on the part of the weak and vulnerable.
          • Social reform is preferable in order to avoid a social revolution.
      • Moral justification as the wealthy and powerful owe their social position, to a significant degree, to the accident of birth.
        • Implies both that a high social position entails social duties, notably those linked to eliminating poverty and supporting the disadvantaged.
          • The poor are 'deserving', in the sense that they are not the architects of their own misfortune and cannot rectify their poverty through simple hard work and self-help.
          • Noblesse oblige
  • In practice this has led to support for limited social and economic intervention such as support for Keynesianism and the welfare state in post war Britain.
    • Limited regulation of markets and higher rates of tax for high earners.
    • How and why have conservatives supported One Nation principles? (15 marks)
      • Their application in the form of social reform and welfare serves are in the long term interests of the wealthy and privileged.
        • Helps to neutralise political discontent on the part of the weak and vulnerable.
          • Social reform is preferable in order to avoid a social revolution.
      • Moral justification as the wealthy and powerful owe their social position, to a significant degree, to the accident of birth.
        • Implies both that a high social position entails social duties, notably those linked to eliminating poverty and supporting the disadvantaged.
          • The poor are 'deserving', in the sense that they are not the architects of their own misfortune and cannot rectify their poverty through simple hard work and self-help.
          • Noblesse oblige

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