EPPE Project (Aggression/ Peer relationships)

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  • EPPE Project (Aggression/ Peer relationships)
    • Procedures
      • 141 centres, 3000 children from different backgrounds around UK (socially diverse- different ethnic backgrounds/ social disavantages)
      • 6 types of daycare, including day and private nurseries, playgroups child minders
      • Children assessed individually at 3/4 years to make profiles
        • Reassessed at primary school to compare progress
          • Used observations/ reports from pre-school worker
            • Included social/ intellectual development
            • Children assessed individually at 3/4 years to make profiles
              • Reassessed at primary school to compare progress
                • Used observations/ reports from pre-school worker
                  • Included social/ intellectual development
                • Took into account parental and home background (show value added)
          • Took into account parental and home background (show value added)
    • Findings
      • Pre-school attendance improved cognitive development, social behaviour e.g independence& cooperation
      • Children at a disadvantage more likely to have adverse social profiles
        • Could be reduced by high quality pre-school
      • Type of care had effects - integrated centres (combined care & education) had best intellectual and social development (even after backgrounds)
      • Disadvantage children were better in mixed social background environments
    • Evaluations
      • Represents UK as large and diverse - however we cannot necessarily argue that the results can be generalised to other cultures.
      • High internal validity as extraneous variables such as background and types of day care were taken into consideration so can argue cause and effect.
      • The study has had many useful applications, for example it helped to begin the surestart programme however some argue applications are not widespread enough

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