Physical and skill related fitness

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What is the definition of muscular endurance?
Where a muscle can continue to contract over a period of time.
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What is the definition of body composition?
The amount of fat, muscle and bone in the body.
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What are the 3 types of body composition?
Endomorph (Fat), Mesomorph (Toned) and Ectomorph (Skinny)
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What is the definition of muscular strength?
The maximum force that can be generated by a muscle or muscle group
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What is the definition of speed?
Distance covered in the time that it has taken. Speed=Distance/Time
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What are the 3 types of speed?
Accelerative speed-up to 30m Pure speed-up to 60m Speed endurance-sprints with short recovery period in between
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What is the definition of flexibility?
Having an adequate range of motion in all of the joints of the body.
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What is the definition of aerobic endurance?
The ability of the cardiorespiratory system to work efficiently supporting nutrients and ocygen to working muscles.
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What is the acronym to remember the physical omponents of fitness?
Most Boys Make Special Flower Arrangements
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What are the physical components of fitness?
Muscular endurance, body composition, muscular strength, speed, flexibility and aerobic endurance
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What is the definition of power?
It is the product of speed and strength . It is expressed as the work done in a unit of time.
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What is the definition of reaction time?
The time taken for the body or parts of the body to respond to a stimulus.
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What are the 2 types of reaction time?
Simple reaction time and choice reaction time
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What is the definition of balance?
The ability to maintain a given posture in a static or dynamic balance.
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What are the 2 types of balance and their definitions?
Static balance is when a performer is still. Dynamic balance is when a performer is moving
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What is the definition of coordination?
The ability to link all parts of a movement into 1 efficient movement. It is the ability to control the body during physical activity
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What is the definition of agility?
The ability of a sports performer to quickly and precisely pove or change direction without losing balance or time
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Name 4 components of fitness that is used in basketball and why.
Muscular endurance, speed, power, reaction time, coordination and agility
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What is a training programme for?
It is so a sports performer can train and become better at their sport
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How does a training programme improve performance?
It is made up of different exercises to improve performance
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What does FITT stand for?
Frequency, Intensity, Type and Time
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What is FITT used for?
They are used for when the coach is designing a training programme
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What are the 7 additional principles of training?
Progressive Overload, Specificity, Individual needs, Varitation, Reversibility, Adaptations and Rest and Recovery
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What is the definition of progressive overload?
In order to progress, training needs to be demanding enough to cause the body to adapt, improving performance
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What is the definition of specificity?
Training should be specific to the individuals sport, activity or goals.
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What is the definition of Individual Differences?
The programme should be designed to meet individual training goals and needs
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What is the definition of variation?
There should be different activities during training, so that the performer does not get bored
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What is the definition of reversibility?
If training stops, or the intensity of training is not sufficient to cause adaptation, training effects are reversed
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What is the definition of adaptation?
How the body reacts to training loads by increasing its ability to cope with these loads.
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What is the definition of rest and recovery?
Rest is needed to allow the performers body to recover and repair any damage caused by training
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Where and how do you measure your heart rate?
Placing your first and second fingers on the artery of the underside of your writst and then you count the number of pulses in 60 seconds.
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How do you work out your maximum heart rate?
HR max = 220 - age
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What is the percentages of your heart rate target zones?
60% - 85%
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What is the target zone used for?
To develop cardiovascular health and fitness
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What is the borg scale?
It is a rating of perceived exertion, on a scale of 6-20
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What does the borg scale measure?
It is used to measure the intesity of the exercise.
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How is the scale used to estimate heart rate?
HR = RPE X 10
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How can you estimate RPE?
RPE = HR / 10
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Why do performers use training methods?
They use it to improve their fitness
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What 2 safety things need to be thought about?
How safe the equipment is and if they are carrying out the training method safely
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What is the purpose of a warm up?
To get the body ready to do the main activity. This could involve jogging and stretching
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What is the purpose of a cool down?
It helps the body get to how it was before exercising and helps the body to start recovering. This can involve jogging or stretching.
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What is static stretching?
When you stretch a muscle and hold it in one position. Active is where you use your won muscles to hold the stretch position and passive is where you use someone or a piece of equipment to help you hold a stretch position
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What is ballistic stretching?
When you make fast movements to stretch your muscles, but you need to be careful because you can strain your muscles
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What is PNF stretching?
The performer stretches the muscle as far as it can go and then a partner holds it in that stretch for 6-10 seconds. (The muscle is in and isometric contraction.) The partner stretches the muscle even more and then the performer can relax the muscle
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What are free weights?
They are weights that are not attached to a machine.
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What are the 2 types of free weights?
Dumb-bell and barbell
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What are the 2 types of excercises with free weights?
Core exercises-These work muscles that make the spine and pelvis stable. Assitance excercises- These work muscles that are specific to a sport or excercise.
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What are the 3 safety points when training with weights?
1-Core excerises before assistance exercises. 2-Change excercise between upper and lower body. 3-Change between oushing and pulling excercises
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What is a rep?
One specific movement or exercise
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What is a set?
The number of reps without a rest
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What is your 1 RM?
The heaviest amount you can lift in 1 RM
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What percentage RM is used and how many reps for Maximum Strength training?
90% with 6 reps (High loads and low reps)
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What percentage RM is used and how many reps for Strength Endurance training?
50-60% with 20 reps (Low loads and high reps)
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What percentage RM is used and how many reps for Elastic Strength training?
75% with 12 reps (Medium loads and medium reps)
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What does circuit training develop?
Muscular strength, power and endurance
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How is circuit training carried out?
You do different exercises one after the other, with usually 6-10 stations.
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What is plyometrics?
Plyometrics develops explosive power and muscular strength. The force is needed to lengthen (eccentric) and then quickly shorten (concentric) the muscle.
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What is continuous training?
When you do the same exercise without having rest. The exercise usually lasts for longer than 30 minutes. The intensity should be at medium.
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What is fartlek training?
It involves a changing in intensity without having any rest periods.
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How do you change the intensity in fartlek training?
You can change the speed, steepness of the ground or using weighted equipment.
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What is interval training?
It is where you have to work for a period and then have a rest or recovery period
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How long should the work period be in interval training?
30 seconds to 5 minutes
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What can you do in the rest or recovery periods in interval training?
Sit down, stand still, walk or jog
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How can you develop your aerobic endurance in interval training?
You can decrease the number of rest or recovery periods or increase the exercise intensity. (60% of VO2 max)
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Why do we test performers?
To help them to create goals for them to improve to
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What 3 things does a coach need to think about when choosing the right test?
1-The test purpose 2-The test situation (Cost, time, ease and number of people) 3-The needs of the sports performer
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What are the pre-test procedures?
Calibration of the equipment, Informed consent and a warmup
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Why do the procedures and measurements need to be correct?
So the results can be compared with other people.
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What do you need to think about when considering the advantages and disadvantages?
Practicality, calibration, reliability and validity
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What is reliability?
When the test has been repeated and the results have a small error bar
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What is validity?
If the test measures the type of fitness that its supposed to measure
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Why is reliability important?
It is important becaue the results need to be close to the true value
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Why is validity important?
To make sure that the test is measuring what you want it to
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What is the definition of body composition?

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The amount of fat, muscle and bone in the body.

Card 3

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Card 4

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Card 5

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