Power and Control: Education -3- Girls

HideShow resource information
Girls and educational attainment
Topic 3
1 of 18
Sharpe (1976 & 94) - Feminisation of the labour market
Girls' priorities have moved away from love, marriage and children. They now focus on being financially independent. This is because of family experiences such as, high divorce rates and marital conflicts. They are now less trusting of male support.
2 of 18
Arnot (1999) - Feminisation of the labour market
There is more geographical mobility and fewer intergenerational ties for women. This allows them to forge their own destinies. 1960s onwards, more middle class girls were going to university.
3 of 18
Arnot (1999) - Positive role models
More female teachers are spreading feminist ideals (encouraging girls to be ambitious and dispell the 'fear of success', that suggested being too clever would not look attractive to boys).
4 of 18
Karen Brady - Positive role models
A good example of aiming above the glass ceiling.
5 of 18
Wilkinson (1998) - Changing attitudes
'The Gender Quake' = A fundamental shift of power from men to women.
6 of 18
Mitsos and Browne (1998) (Supports views such as Wilkinson's)
Feminist movements have resulted in improvements in women's rights and also increased their self-esteem. Many women don't want to class themselves as feminists, but many benefit from the movement. Girls don't have to be too radicalised.
7 of 18
Mitsos and Browne (1998) (Supports views such as Wilkinson's) Continued
The 'Bedroom Culture' improves girl's linguistic skills, boys do not develop their skills in the same way.
8 of 18
Gray & McLellan (2006) - Changing attitudes
Surveyed Yr.5 pupils and found that they had gendered responses to education. Girls were more enthusiastic than boys. Boys were disengaged and disaffected.
9 of 18
Gray and McLellan (2006) - Changing attitudes Continued
Although, they did believe this gendered response was too simplistic. 9% of girls were anti-school and some boys were pro-school.
10 of 18
Robinson (2002) - Linguistic abilities
Girls go to their bedrooms, read magazines and talk. This develops their reading and linguistic skills. Boys play outside and don't complete school work. Their culture consists of anti-school values and perhaps make them become deviants (crime).
11 of 18
Robinson (2002) - Linguistic abilities Continued
Boys also don't have the chance to develop their comprehension and linguistic skills.
12 of 18
Burns and Bracey (2001) - Linguistic abilities
Yr.7 girls spend 40 mins on homework but boys spend 12 mins. Boys believe their work should be completed at school. They don't believe in practices and redrafts.
13 of 18
Swann (1992) - Changes in teacher's expectations of girls (In school factors)
Boys were a major contributor in group discussions. Girls preferred paired work (involving listening and cooperating). 'Taking turns' created a positive image of girls.
14 of 18
Rosenthal & Jacobsen (1968) - Changes in teacher's expectations of girls (In school factors)
'Self-fulfilling prophecy' = This is where the individual labels themselves because of factors in the environment that have influenced them. The individual then aims to achieve this label (e.g. achieve well, or not so well at school).
15 of 18
Plummer (2000) - In school factors
The preoccupation with 'failing boys' diverts attention away from underachieving girls. There are a high proportion of working class girls who are failing in the school system.
16 of 18
Weiner (1995) - Media representation of women
Since 1980s, teachers have been forcefully challenging stereotypes and sexist images have been removed from curriculum material. A recent analysis of primary and secondary school textbooks show that this has not yet been fully achieved.
17 of 18
Weiner (1995) - Media representation of women Continued
He has described the history curriculum as a 'woman-free zone'.
18 of 18

Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

Girls' priorities have moved away from love, marriage and children. They now focus on being financially independent. This is because of family experiences such as, high divorce rates and marital conflicts. They are now less trusting of male support.

Back

Sharpe (1976 & 94) - Feminisation of the labour market

Card 3

Front

There is more geographical mobility and fewer intergenerational ties for women. This allows them to forge their own destinies. 1960s onwards, more middle class girls were going to university.

Back

Preview of the back of card 3

Card 4

Front

More female teachers are spreading feminist ideals (encouraging girls to be ambitious and dispell the 'fear of success', that suggested being too clever would not look attractive to boys).

Back

Preview of the back of card 4

Card 5

Front

A good example of aiming above the glass ceiling.

Back

Preview of the back of card 5
View more cards

Comments

No comments have yet been made

Similar Sociology resources:

See all Sociology resources »See all Sociological theory resources »