Citizenship A343 Rights and Responsibilities Flashcards

What are moral rights?
What we expect from others. There is no law to cover these.
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What are moral responsibilities?
What we should do to support others so they can enjoy certain rights.
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Give 3 examples of moral rights people have at school/college.
Parents expect to be contacted by a teacher if their child misbehaves. Students are expected to hand work in on time. Teachers expect students to listen to instructions.
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Give 3 examples of moral responsibilities people have at school/college.
Teachers should teach the correct syllabus and mark work. Students should do their best and work hard at school. Parents should make sure homework is completed and sign their homework diary.
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What is the Home-School agreement?
A written agreement that sets out the rights and responsibilities of teachers, students, and parents in a school or college.
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What are legal rights?
Expectations that the law says must be met.
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What are legal responsibilities?
Responsibilities supported by the law. They must happen.
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Give 3 examples of legal rights at school/college.
Students must be educated in a safe classroom. Students have the right to free education. Students have the right to receive religious education.
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Give 2 examples of legal responsibilities at school/college.
Parents must ensure children are educated in school or home tuition. Teachers must act in loco parentis towards the students.
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What recent changes have been made to the schooling system?
Schools can apply to become an Academy. There is additional support for parent/organisations who want to set up schools. People must stay in education until they are 18. English baccalaureate introduced.
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How are legal rights/responsibilities enforced in schools?
School rules/policies - code of behaviour. Complaints procedure - teacher, head of year/subject, head teacher, governors, local authority.
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What is the difference between informal action and formal action?
Informal action doesn't involve any legal process. E.g. a detention. Formal action is part of a legal process which should be carefully recorded. E.g. an exclusion.
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How are legal rights/responsibilities enforced in schools? (2)
Headteachers and governors must ensure schools are safe for staff and students. Must have an anti-bullying policy.
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How are legal rights/responsibilities enforced in schools? (3)
Ofsted is the government regulator for inspecting schools. Once inspected, a school will have their report published. This helps parents make informed choices and makes schools more accountable.
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How do local authorities/government departments give advice to citizens about their rights?
Local authorities should offer advice on housing, education, trading standards, and social care. Government should offer advice on taxation, benefits, pensions, school curriculum, energy saving, and the law.
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How do local authorities/government departments give advice to citizens about their rights? (2)
DirectGov is the 'official government website for citizens' which claims to give 'easy access to public services.
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How do local authorities/government departments give advice to citizens about their rights? (3)
Citizens can contact an official regulator/ombudsman for advice or to complain. Ofsted - education. Ofcom - telephones. OfGem - gas and electricity. IPCC - police.
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Define 'ombudsman'.
Checks to see if people have been treated unfairly by looking into complaints about the services they have used.
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Give 3 examples of independent agencies that provide citizens with information and advice about their rights.
Citizen's Advice Bureau - advice about debt, benefits, housing, employment, consumer problems. Which? - consumer advice. TheSite - owned by YouthNet UK, gives impartial information for young people.
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Give examples of some of the human rights protected by the UDHR.
Right to life. Right to liberty. Right to security. Right to a fair trial. Right to vote. Right to freedom of speech. Right to privacy. Right to freedom of religion.
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When was the UDHR drawn up by the United Nations?
1948. It does not consist of laws. Instead it is used to help measure the human rights record of different governments across the world.
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When was the European Convention put into practise?
1950. This gave European citizens the power to appeal to the European Court of Human Rights if they feel that laws in their country have not protected their rights.
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Describe 4 cases of where right conflict.
1. Security VS Privacy. 2. Freedom of Expression VS Encouraging Hatred. 3. Freedom of Press VS Privacy. 4. Freedom of Religion VS Discrimination.
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Give one example of an organisation that campaigns to help human rights around the world.
Amnesty International.
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

What are moral responsibilities?

Back

What we should do to support others so they can enjoy certain rights.

Card 3

Front

Give 3 examples of moral rights people have at school/college.

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

Give 3 examples of moral responsibilities people have at school/college.

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

What is the Home-School agreement?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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