AQA Psychology- Unit 3

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1. What did Ennis find?

  • Neanderthal's skeletons were analysed and it was found they showed no division of labour which is why they died out
  • Lonley hearts ads were analysed and it was found that mate choice was consistent across cultures
  • Men had higher cortisol levels during times of stress compared to women, potentially due to them not tending and befriending as much as women
  • 10,000 ppts, 37 cultures, found mate choice was consistent across cultures
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2. What did McConaghy find?

  • 2 years olds were 70% correct in identifying gender compared to 90% of 3 year olds, showing improvement with age
  • Children under 5 identified a doll as a girl depite it having genitals on show
  • That the ages Kohlberg proposed are incorrect
  • Only at 3-4 do children realise gender is constant over time and those who answered correctly showed greatest interest in same sex models

3. What did Coate et al find?

  • Trauma (a mother with depression due to miscarriage) triggered a young boy to start cross dressing to relieve the stress
  • 115 boys studied and 64% of them who went on to have gender dysphoria also had separation anxiety
  • The research has social consquences as those with gender dysphoria can be helped
  • Challenges the Brain Sex Theory, because the BSTc doesn't develop until adolescence but symptoms of gender dysphoria are felt in childhood

4. What did Buss find?

  • 10,000 ppts, 37 cultures, found mate choice was consistent across cultures
  • Lonley hearts ads were analysed and it was found that mate choice was consistent across cultures
  • Neanderthal's skeletons were analysed and it was found they showed no division of labour which is why they died out
  • Men had higher cortisol levels during times of stress compared to women, potentially due to them not tending and befriending as much as women

5. What are the evaluative studies of the evolutionary explantion to gender?

  • Kuhn and Steinder, Buss, Dunbar and Waynforth, Ennis, Miller
  • Kuhn and Steinder, Buss, Dunbar and Waynforth, Ennis
  • Ennis, Miller, Walster et al, Kuhn and Steinder
  • Kuhn and Steinder, Buss, Walster et al

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