ICT WJEC A2 - TOPIC 3: HCI (human computer interface)

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  • Created by: maya_x
  • Created on: 30-05-17 08:09

EXPERT USERS and NOVICE USERS

  • The novice user's priority is the ease of learning 
  • The expert user's priority is to get the job done in the least possible time
  • Novice users need clear navigational structure
  • Expert users already know the commands so they dont need to use wizards (unlike the novice users)
  • Expert users are aware of multiple ways of completing one task which takes less time (they know the shortcuts [eg. use command line interfaces])
  • Novice users need the interface to be as simple and easy to use as possible, so having a set colour scheme would make it easier for them to use and remember commands
  • To assist a novice user, the HCI could provide tutorials (easy access to help)
  • The novise user will prefer a step-by-step approach to complete a task, whereas an expert user will want to get as much done at once as possible
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FEATURES OF A HCI-DISABLED USER

For users who cannot use their arms-  use speech recognition rather than keyboards/ mouse, use specialist input devices (eye movements/ brainwave controlled)

For user with bad/ poor eyesite- ability to magnify areas on the screen, ability to increase the font size of text

For those who are blind- use of a braille keyboard [and they can have braille printers to produce output which other blind people can read], voice recorgnition (greater use of sound rather than visual aid)

For those who are colour blind- use the correct colour schemes

For those who are deaf- use virtual messages rather than warning sounds

For people with poor hand-eye coordination- use of a large mouse or a trackerball

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FEATURES OF A HCI-CHILD LEARNING TO READ

Have minimum amount of text on screen (the child is currently unable to read, so this would just confuse them)

Use a child friendly font (the child wil not be able to read fancy fonts... the font needs to be simple)

Use bright colours to attract the child's attention

Have an uncluttered appearence (eg. by simply having a word and an image to aid remebering the vocabs)

Use sound buttons (so they can hear how to pronounce words and certain sounds)

Use animation and videos to keep their interest (try to make sure that these animations link to the topic and are assisting the child to learn to read)

Instant feedback on their response ('well done' or 'try again' messages)

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(a) FACTORS WHEN DESIGNING AN INTERFACE

1) CONSISTENCY OF SIGNPOSTING AND POP UP INFORMATION:

  • every 'next' should be in the same place, using the same icon
  • navigation around the program should be clear, consistent and easy to follow

2) LAYOUT APPROPRIATE TO TASK: (there should be a standard feel to the software)

  • uncluttered text for children learning to read
  • minimal text for children learning to read to build confidence

3) CLEAR NAVIGATIONAL STRUCTURE:

  • speeds things up if there is a similar route through the programs - this means that users dont have to keep learning new things [ NOT LEARNING TWICE!!!]

4) CUSTOMISABLE TO SUIT THE NEEDS OF THE USER:

  • the user can change parts of the interface to make it easier for them (eg. change font size)
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(b) FACTORS WHEN DESIGNING AN INTERFACE

5) ON SCREEN HELP:

  • this saves time as the user will not have to waste time searching for manuals/ tutorials on the internet
  • if there is nobody else around to help at the time (then it is essential that the user recieves this help from the interface)
  • wizards to take you through the tasks

6) USED BY DISABLED USERS:

  • (similar to the features of a HCI for a disabled user)
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