How do Presidents veto legislation, and how significant is the presidential veto?

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How do Presidents veto legislation, and how significant is the presidential
veto?- PLAN
Veto- a power of the President which allows them to reject a piece of
legislation passed by Congress
Two ways in which the President can exercise his veto- by sending it to
back to Congress with reasons why he does not like it or by using the
pocket veto.
Normal veto- Sends it back to Congress, who they then have the option
of trying to overturn it, but this needs a 2/3 majority in both houses,
which is hard to achieve and rarely happens. Last time this happened- to
Bush in 2007, Congress overturned his veto on a bill authorising water
projects which would help Hurricane Katrina victims.
Pocket veto- applies only at the end of the legislative session, and
cannot be overridden. This is when bills are awaiting Presidential action
when Congress adjourns, and the legislation is simply forgotten about-
described as "loosing legislation down the back of the sofa"
Significance of the veto- shows that they are a leader, not a ruler, as
they do not have control completely over what Congress passes. Can
also be of importance during times of divided government- Presidents
can override the majority party in either of part of Congress- eg Bush
with various acts following Congress becoming Democrat controlled.
Finally, it is significant because it can be used as a threat for Congress to
bargain with them over the bill.

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