GEO2 AS REVISION NOTES REBRANDING PLACES, CROWDED COASTS

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Preview of GEO2 AS REVISION NOTES REBRANDING PLACES, CROWDED COASTS

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REVISION NOTES
EXAMINER'S TIPS:
This exam is designed to test both knowledge and understanding of geographical concepts as well as geographical
skills.
In order to ensure the highest possible grades you should be able to focus on the question set, to be able to use
resources effectively and to get your fieldwork in a form that works for the exam.
You have 75 minutes for this exam that means 35 minutes per question and a few minutes left for checking or
planning. Think about quality and not quantity.
REMEMBER practice parts of questions under timed conditions.
Write a short glossary as you go which will provide invaluable for revision (glossary provided).
For the 15 mark question, the realism of the area and locational detail are likely to score highly, e.g. Southgate in
Redcar or St Hilda's in Middlesbrough.
The question could be based on planning and methods, or presentation and results, or conclusion and evaluation.
Credit is given for GIS, new technology, named web references and qualitative and unusual methods/sources.
Data stimulus questions should be very simple and could be maps, charts, graphs, tables, photographs or
cartoons. You have to make careful observations of the resource, understand the differences between the key
words, look for patterns and anomalies, direct use (e.g. in figure 10...), full coverage of the resource and use of
terminology. This question is essentially about responding to the resources provided; you do not have to deliver
detailed or wide ranged case studies. Try to keep a balanced range if it says physical and human.
Get together a list (also provided) of the key research sources used so that you can quickly check the
resources-remember a wide variety is better than two in detail.
BE CAREFUL...
Make sure you keep your eye on the time.
You do not need to fill the page: quality over quantity.
Do not miss a key word otherwise you will not get in the top band.
Don't put too much detail on one fieldwork or research method, and therefore lack a range.
Watch out for rural/urban.
Look at past mark schemes and reports to see how it is possible that you can leap from level three banding to
level our-you need to include detail and judgements in the question.
ANSWERING CASE STUDY QUESTIONS
1. For every question you need to do three main things:
Read the question properly.
Figure out your structure before you start (plan).
Include relevant geographical terms.
2. For case study questions you also need to include plenty of relevant details.
3. This includes things like place names, statistics, dates and names of organisation or companies.
4. They need to be relevant.
5. For many case study questions it is always great to show specific knowledge through maps and add labels.
It is not very necessary.
6. `With reference to one named area' means you need to include a case study.

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Page 2

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When you write about causes make sure you split it into physical and human.
8. Use relevant terms
ANSWERING FIELDWORK AND RESEARCH QUESTIONS
1. Read the question carefully if you are asked to describe a programme about fieldwork and research, you
need to talk about the methodology for your fieldwork and talk about your research sources. If you're
asked to describe the results of your fieldwork and research, don't forget to briefly what you did first.…read more

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If you have to read from a graph draw working lines on to help you get an accurate figure.
Isoline maps
1. They are lines on a map linking up all the places where something is the same.
2. If the place you are being asked about the on an isoline you can just read off the value. However if it is an
estimate you can estimate.
Town centre plans
1.…read more

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It allows you to show you a wide range of data onto an axis without having to draw onto one axis without
having to draw a large graph.
Choropleth maps
They show information using colours or patterns.
This shows how something varies between different areas.
In exams the diagrams are cross-hatched lines and dots. It is easy
to make mistakes because patterns can seem similar.
Dot maps
They show distribution and quantity using identical symbols.
They show how something is distributed.…read more

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PHILIP ALLAN LINKS:
November 2012issue-page 29-31 (land use mapping)
September 2012issue-page 22-24 (correlation and causation)
April 2012issue-page 2-5 (Abu Dhabi goes green-rebranding places), 20-21 (creating a fieldwork notebook) and
page 26-29 (Johannesburg: changing economic landscapes-rebranding places).
November 2011-page 8-12 (coastal erosion: study of conflict-crowded coasts) and 13-15 (edge lands-rebranding
places).
September 2011 -page 12-15 (rebranding Croydon-rebranding places), 16-18 (Getting started how sustainable are
London's 2012 Olympics?-rebranding places) and 33-35 (practical geography: census-rebranding places).…read more

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Biological weathering Seeds germinate as rocks grow and as they break rocks
fall apart.
Boulder clay Crushed rock absorbed in water from the last ice age.
Breakwaters They are usually concrete blocks or boulders deposited
off the coast. They force waves to break offshore and
so the wave's energy and erosion power is reduced
before they reach the shore.
Brownfield sites Land areas that were previously used for industry and
commerce which can now be redeveloped.
Chemical weathering This is where acid rain dissolves rock.…read more

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Eustatic changes A worldwide change of sea level which may be caused
by the growth and decay of ice sheets.
Eutrophication Excessive richness of nutrients in a lake or other body
of water, frequently due to runoff from the land.
Fetch The distance a wave has to travel.
Fjords A long, narrow, deep inlet of the sea between high
cliffs.
Footloose Industries are not tied to raw materials.…read more

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Riprap Boulders piled up along the coast which absorb the
wave energy and so reduce erosion.
Sea change Australian term for coastalisation.
Sediment cells Stretches of coastline where erosion, deposition and
movement of sediment occur in isolation from adjacent
cells. They are the basic unit of cell management. Their
closed nature calls for careful management to ensure
sustainability.
Slumping This is when a large area of land collapses. Slumping
(wetting and drying of cliffs causing cracks, adding
water so the cracks become lubricated).…read more

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INVESTIGATING THE GROWTH OF CONTRASTING CROWDED COASTS SUCH AS A UK RESORT COASTLINE AND A FOREIGN ONE, E.G. SPANISH COSTA
OR THE FLORIDA COAST.
KEY QUESTION: WHY ARE COASTAL ZONES SO FAVOURED FOR DEVELOPMENT?
This is a general question and does not need specific knowledge. In-depth case studies come later. Examples are
needed but in little depth.
KEY FACTS
Coasts only cover 10% of the inhabited land space, yet they are home to more than 60% of the world's
population.…read more

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Coasts are very important, they are not only an economic advantage but due to the natural defences, it also
reduces the natural hazards.
Coasts are dynamic they are constantly changing.
WHY ARE COASTS DYNAMIC?
The coast is said to have a dynamic equilibrium, the balanced state of a system when its inputs and
outputs are equal.…read more

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