Cold Environments A Level Geography Detailed Notes and Questions

Very useful set of notes and a lot of questions in a table - great for revision

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  • Created on: 27-11-12 04:22
Preview of Cold Environments A Level Geography Detailed Notes and Questions

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TANGLIN TRUST SCHOOL
AQA AS GEOGRAPHY
mock
REVISION GUIDE
Physical Geography
UNIT 1
COLD ENVIRONMENTS
NAME...................................
Example questions!
Questions................ Do
ne
L.ALLEN.COM

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What are the three types of cold environments? For each one describe the location and
key characteristics.
2 What is an ice age? What are the times in between ice ages called?
3 When was the Quaternary period? When did ice leave the British Isles?
4 What are the reasons for climate fluctuations like ice ages?
5 Where is most of the permanent ice today? Table 2.1
6 Describe the maximum extent of ice in the British Isles during the ice ages.…read more

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What is a kettle hole? Describe the main features & formation of this landform?
49 Why are braided streams common in these areas?
50 What are pro glacial lakes and overflow channels? Give an example and explain the
formation.
51 What is periglaciation?
52 Where will you find periglacial regions today?
53 What is permafrost? How is it formed?
54 Outline the three main types of permafrost and their characteristics.…read more

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Calving
Corrie/Cirque
Crag and tail
Compressional
flow
Cold based
glacier
Drift
Drumlin
Englacial
Erratic
Equilibrium line
Esker
Extensional flow
Frost heave
Freeze thaw
Fiord/Fjord
Firn
Fluvioglacial
Landforms
Fluvioglacial
processes
Glacial system
Glacial Budget
Glacial movement
Glacial processes
Glacial
valley/trough
Ground
contraction
Groundwater
freezing
Hanging Valley
Internal
flow/deformation
Ice Age
Ice cap
Ice core
Ice sheet
Interstadial
Ice lense
Ice wedge
Input
Ice shelf
Ice marginal
landforms
Kame
Kettle Hole
Kame terrace
Lodgement till
Meltwater stream
Morain
Nivation
L.ALLEN.…read more

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EXAMPLE QUESTIONS
1 Describe the features of the glacier in the picture below. 3
2 Identify the landforms in the diagram below.
3 Describe and explain how the landscape has changed from the first to the last diagram below.
Annotate the diagram to help you.
L.ALLEN.…read more

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Glaciers are moving bodies of ice, formed by the accumulation of snow on the ground's surface. Glaciers are powerful
agents of erosion, transport and depostion that are able to shape the landscape and create spectactular landscapes.
The term 'glacial' refers to the work of ice and metwater in shaping the landscape.
(ii) How do Glaciers form?
Glaciers form when accumulation (i.e. winter snow fall) is greater than ablation (summer melting).…read more

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Ice Shelf
You should make sure you are clear about the distinction between these different glaciers and learn named examples
and their locations
THE GLACIAL SYSTEM
Glaciers are systems, they represent the balance between inputs outputs stores and transfers.…read more

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Greenland and Antarctica
due to very cold temperatures accumulation and ablation are low.
temperatures remain at 0oC throughout and the PMP (Pressure Melting Point see below) is not reached the glacier
therefore moves by internal flow rather than basal slippage (due to the lack of meltwater)
The glacier is frozen to the bed and without an increase in pressure there is no melting movement is therefore very slow
(12cm per day) and there is little erosion.…read more

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