Wuthering Heights  Form & Structure

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  • Created on: 06-04-13 10:14
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  • Wuthering Heights    Form & Structure
    • Anachrony- a deliberate shuffling of time sequences in a narrative.
      • A common feature of novels, for example, is that the order in which the plot develops is quite different from the chronological sequence of events in the original story.
        • The narrative moves forward through a developing story line; simultaneously explaining a large span of events.
          • The novel begins when the story is almost finished, but Lockwood's curiosity triggers the narration. We have to re-live the past imaginatively.
            • Past and present are bound up in a way that does not divide the time frame awkwardly.
    • Nelly's narration is heavily dramatised: she records conversations as well as events etc.), which strongly affects the reader's perceptions and opinions.
    • The novelist was not able to use her own voice (Emily Bronte wrote under the ambiguous pseudonym of Ellis Bell) so the story must speak for itself.
      • We are thrust into the story (in the same way Lockwood is), a stranger to the characters, relationships and setting of the story.
        • Lockwood and Nelly provide the necessary objectivity. Smaller narratives such as Cathy's diary give us glimpses into the lives of the protagonists.
        • Lockwood is an outsider, intrigued by the mystery of Wuthering Heights, who presents the situation as he sees it.
          • He provides an insight into the 19th century world
          • His format of storytelling is intimate and personal (diary form), establishing a partly subjective tone.
            • His style is factual, full of comment, educated and literary. He provides a perspective less coloured by bias than Nelly's. Long, complex sentences allude to his sophistication which we as the reader find amusing.
    • Bronte steers our response through the the abrupt reactions of her narrators. Even the setting has a life and mind of its own, and contributes to our heart-and-mind experience.
      • The novel begins when the story is almost finished, but Lockwood's curiosity triggers the narration. We have to re-live the past imaginatively.
        • Past and present are bound up in a way that does not divide the time frame awkwardly.
    • Nelly  has an energy and urgency with her style of narration. She gives us a detailed account of the story;  the use  of verbatim-dialogue accounting for the conversations: which enhances her credibility as a narrator.
      • Her sentences are brief and rapid compared to Lockwood's, they convey her depth of engagement in the story.
        • She provides an inner frame within the benefit of hindsight, and unlike Lockwood she is a character in her own narrative- which increases her subjectivity and sometimes compromises her reliability,
          • Her moral stance is difficult to read at times- she is perhaps inconsistent in some ways.
            • She is perhaps limited by her social standing, and as the reader we might at times assume that we can read the situation better ourselves.
          • Nelly is telling the story to Lockwood, so we have to judge what she says based on this- considering: does she elaborate, exaggerate or edit what happens for his benefit?
    • The multiple layers of narrative allow us immediacy when seeing characters, and inevitably we find ourselves closer to the action as a direct result of the narrative style.
  • Her sentences are brief and rapid compared to Lockwood's, they convey her depth of engagement in the story.
    • She provides an inner frame within the benefit of hindsight, and unlike Lockwood she is a character in her own narrative- which increases her subjectivity and sometimes compromises her reliability,
      • Her moral stance is difficult to read at times- she is perhaps inconsistent in some ways.
        • She is perhaps limited by her social standing, and as the reader we might at times assume that we can read the situation better ourselves.
      • Nelly is telling the story to Lockwood, so we have to judge what she says based on this- considering: does she elaborate, exaggerate or edit what happens for his benefit?

Comments

Reanne


Cheeeeers

070998

Apart from the fact that the lack of categories completely lost me, this was still good, thanks

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