Malawi's Development Issues

  • Created by: Rose356
  • Created on: 11-04-19 11:24
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  • Malawi's Development
    • Physical Barriers
      • Landlocked: This means that to import/export, Malawi has to take their goods to a port in Mozambique. The journey takes a long time and is expensive.
      • Rural Isolation: 85% of the population lives rurally. This mens that many can be cut off during floods. Also the poor infrastructure and dirt tracks make travelling to markets for trade takes a long time.
      • Changing climate: The warmer climate means there are water shortages which means that the crops don't get enough water, so there's not enough food or water (to drink). However, when the rains come, there are more frequent floods as they come more intensely.
      • Air pollution: Rapid urban growth has made the air quality decrease due to dust, industrial smoke and car exhaust fumes. Also, in rural areas, air pollution has increased from smoke from bush fires and car tyre fires.
        • Water Pollution: Rapidly growing squatter settlements have no sanitation or sewage management, so rivers have become contaminated with waste and bacteria. Also, in urban areas, floods have run off the tarmac and so the water supplies become contaminated.
    • Economic Barriers
      • Trade: Malawi trades with other countries by exporting primary products. The developed countries manufacture these raw materials into secondary products which Malawi buys back from them. However, these secondary products are more expensive so Malawi pays the developed country more than they payed them.
      • Cash crops: Farmers grow crops only to sell them. The commodities are sold on the global market but these prices change all the time and as most profits go to the supermarkets, the farmers usually get very little.
        • Colonisation: Unilever (produces PG Tips), has plantations where they employ farmers to grow the tea leaves. However, the workers only get 1p/kg even though Unilever gives them firewood, shelter, lunch and water.
      • Colonisation: Unilever (produces PG Tips), has plantations where they employ farmers to grow the tea leaves. However, the workers only get 1p/kg even though Unilever gives them firewood, shelter, lunch and water.
      • Global Trade: WTO (World Trade Organisation) helps developing country trade with developed countries. They aim to get rid of tariffs on goods which make the goods more expensive. However, this cannot always be avoided.
        • Tariffs: Malawi sells raw coffee beans to businesses such as costa who roast the beans themselves because it is cheaper for them to roast the beans themselves instead of buying ready roasted beans from Malawi. This is because raw beans have no tariffs whereas, roasted beans have a 7.5% tariff.

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