Physical & Mental Demands of Performance

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  • Physical & Mental Demands of Performance
    • Fatigue - The feeling of extreme physical or mental tiredness brought on by extreme exertion and it can result in temporary loss of strength and energy. If you suffer from fatigue, the following is likely to occur.
      • Concentration levels will decrease and you are more likely to make mistakes of judgement
      • Your body or parts of your body may not be able to carry on with what you are doing due to local muscular fatigue and it can even result in you having to stop what you are doing completely.
        • This can be a dangerous condition and carrying on may result in injury. This is why substitutions are allowed in major sports so that players can be replaced when they show signs of fatigue.
      • Skill levels decrease as speed and strength decrease
      • If you are not able to have some form of rest, you will be forced to stop.
        • This can be a dangerous condition and carrying on may result in injury. This is why substitutions are allowed in major sports so that players can be replaced when they show signs of fatigue.
    • Stress - The body's reaction to a change that requires a physical, mental or emotional adjustment or response and this, in turn, can be linked to other factors in any sporting situation. Some people may become more aggressive and others may find that levels of arousal are increased.
      • Excitement or suspense can lead to tension. If this is experienced before taking part in an activity it can result in tightness in the muscles, which could then have a physical effect.
      • Anxiety can make you feel uneasy and apprehensive both before and during performance. If you become over anxious, you are likely to make mistakes. However, most performers consider some level of anxiety to be necessary to help them focus and prepare.
      • Nervousness can add to your tension levels, making you feel more tense and even agitated to the point where it can have a physical effect such as shaking or feeling sick.
      • Motivation will almost certainly decrease.
      • Almost everyone who has ever taken part in physical activity has experienced stress and it is far more common in individual activities where the focus is on one person, however it still occurs in team games.
    • Injury - The chances of getting an injury through taking part in physical activity are quite high and most performers experience one at some time. The essential point to bear in mind is that injury prevention should be paramount and that all possible precautions should be taken in order to avoid it and minimise the risk.
      • Techniques and safe practise should be used at all times and there are countless examples where using a poor technique has resulted in an injury to both performers and opponents. These injuries can be considered to be in the categories of internally and externally caused injuries.
      • Internally caused injuries - Injuries that occur when the performer is solely responsible
        • Externally caused injuries - Injuries that are caused by factors other than the performer themselves, such as the equipment, opponent or playing conditions.
          • Foul play or incorrect actions. This involves other players, usually opponents, and these type of injuries can be very serious. This is why there are rules to prevent them from happening.
          • Impact injuries. Many activities permit physical contact within the rules of the game, so contact is inevitable. There can also be impact with equipment such as goal posts, hockey sticks, etc.
        • Overuse injuries. These can be caused by either training or performing too much and can include stress fractures and muscle tendon injuries.
        • Sudden injuries. When you are taking part in physical activity there is also a strain put on the body owing to lots of stretching, twisting and turning, often resulting in problems, such as hamstring pulls.
      • Externally caused injuries - Injuries that are caused by factors other than the performer themselves, such as the equipment, opponent or playing conditions.
        • Foul play or incorrect actions. This involves other players, usually opponents, and these type of injuries can be very serious. This is why there are rules to prevent them from happening.
        • Impact injuries. Many activities permit physical contact within the rules of the game, so contact is inevitable. There can also be impact with equipment such as goal posts, hockey sticks, etc.
    • Common Injuries
      • Head injuries
      • Fractures
      • Hypothermia
      • Joints and muscles injuries.
      • Cuts

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