Themes of Medea

Not finished! A few themes of Medea with examples from the play.

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  • Medea
    • Oikos
      • Family is obviously a very important theme in Medea. The play revolves around getting revenge on her husband and killing her children..
      • Medea also got Pelias' daughters to kill Pelias himself so she could be together with Jason
      • Medea has a few hints of sanity, for example when thinking about killing her children.
        • Medea: "I could never do the deed"
          • Medea: I will not do it. Goodbye to my plans"
            • Medea has a few hints of sanity, for example when thinking about killing her children.
              • Medea: "I could never do the deed"
                • Medea: I will not do it. Goodbye to my plans"
                • But then we see the sadistic personality come straight back out.
                  • Medea: "But what is wrong with me? Do I want to make myself ridiculous by letting me enemies go unpunished?"
                  • Medea: "Shame on my cowardice in even letting my mind dally with those weak thoughts"
                    • Medea: "But what is wrong with me? Do I want to make myself ridiculous by letting me enemies go unpunished?"
                • Here, the audience would not like Medea. Her sudden revoking of her plans could give hope to the audience...
                  • ...But just as quickly, they are put back into place. The audience would see Medea as sadistic and evil, and insane.
          • But then we see the sadistic personality come straight back out.
            • Medea: "Shame on my cowardice in even letting my mind dally with those weak thoughts"
            • Here, the audience would not like Medea. Her sudden revoking of her plans could give hope to the audience...
              • ...But just as quickly, they are put back into place. The audience would see Medea as sadistic and evil, and insane.
        • Foreigners
          • Medea is not only a foreigner, but not even Greek. She is a barbarian
            • She would have dressed, spoken and looked differently to the other women.
            • She has a fiesty attitude, which reminds me of Gloria from Modern Family!
          • Xenophobic society
          • Because Jason is divorcing Medea, she is no longer a citizen of Trozen and has to be exiled.
            • Along with her two children
              • Jason originally wants them to go too but Medea's cleverness persuaded them to stay..
        • Revenge
          • Medea states that she will get revenge immediately.
            • Though we first hear about revenge from the Nurse worrying about the children at the start of the play.
            • On Jason leaving her for Glauce in order to gain political status.
          • Medea sends her children in with a robe and garland for Glauce. Because she is so young and naive, she accepts the gifts without any suspicion.
            • Glauce melts and when Creon tries to save her, he melts too. Medea completes stage one of her revenge!
          • Medea then kills her two children. Their cries for help would shock the audience
            • Infanticide was a very serious crime
        • Woman's place in society
          • Medea is not like other women, as we find out very early on.
            • She is a cunning and clever woman, almost 'masculine' in those times.
              • She manages to get Jason to let the children stay in Trozen
                • Tutor: "Medea, these children, I tell you, are no longer to be exiled"
              • She is able to convince Creon to let her stay one more day in Trozen (This has tragic and ironic consequences!)
          • Jason comes across as arrogant when he talks about women.
            • Jason (talking about Glauce) "If she is like the rest of her sex, I think I shall persuade her"

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