Henry VII's foreign relations with Scotland and Ireland

Refers to AQA AS History; Britain 1487-1529.

The reign of Henry VII: Political power and control section.

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  • Created by: Bethany
  • Created on: 05-05-13 15:43
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  • Henry VII's foreign relations with Scotland and Ireland
    • Scotland
      • Traditionally difficult relationship.
        • Border Warfare
        • Franco-Scottish alliance.
      • No real problems at start of reign. James IV minor and regent was an anglophile Scot.
        • BUT - 1495, James IV came to throne
          • Dedicated warrior, power hungry
      • James IV and Warbeck
        • Recognised Warbeck, sheltered him for two years.
        • Paid him a pension, offered cousin, Lady Catherine Gordon in marriage. In 1496, Warbeck launched abortive invasion of England with king's support.
          • Henry retaliated with largest army of reign
            • James IV saved from invasion by Cornish rebellion
      • The move towards peace
        • It is understood that Henry VII would have been victorious over the Scots in 1497 had the Cornish rebellion not taken him by surprise.
        • James IV left isolated by Warbeck's departure.
          • Suited both Kings to make peace at Truce of Ayton, 1497.
            • It is understood that Henry VII would have been victorious over the Scots in 1497 had the Cornish rebellion not taken him by surprise.
            • Established Anglo-Scottish harmony for remainder of the reign. Formal peace treaty 1502.
        • Agreement in 1501 for his daughter, Princess Margaret, to marry James IV.
          • Took place in 1503
          • Symbolised long-term strength of Anglo-Scottish relations
    • Ireland
      • Technically part of KIngdom of England
      • Simnel Imposture
        • King showed leniency
        • Did force Earl of Kildare and other Anglo-Irish nobles to swear an oath of allegiance to the English monarchy.
      • In 1491, the King lost patience after Warbeck appeared in Dublin.
        • Kildare dismissed and small English army sent to Ireland.
        • Warbeck fled to France
      • 1494: Poynings sent to Ireland as lord deputy
        • Undermined authority of Anglo-English nobles through 'Poynings' Laws.'
          • The most important of which prevented them holding parliamentary sessions or legislating without England's approval.
        • Restored order, crushing continuing troubles and a major rebellion organised by Kildare's brother.
        • Warbeck prevented from returning to Ireland.
        • Arrested Kildare, sent to England as prisoner. His lands were attained by Irish parliament.
      • 1496: Ruling reverted to Anglo-Irish nobles rather than Lord Deputy.
        • Reinstated Kildare and attainder reversed, but kept his son at court to guarantee loyalty.

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