Consequences of globalisation

AS Geography Edexcel Unit 1: Global Challenges exam. 

Consequences of globalisation

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  • Consequences of globalisation
  • Environmental
    • Consequences of globalisation
    • Vast amount of areas are destroyed
      • Expand cities
      • Build cities
      • e.g. cattle ranches
        • McDonalds
      • (forests)
        • Need for fuel
        • Mineral reserve
          • 2nd biggest iron mine in the Amazon
        • Timber was shipped away
          • e.g. Mahogany
            • $12,000 dollars for a Mahogany tree
            • One of the biggest importers for Mahogany is the UK
        • Tropical rain forests cover less than 5% of the Earth yet they are biodiversity hotspots
          • Hold 1/2 of the known species
          • At the current rate, the forests will be gone within 50 years.
            • By the WWF
        • Food
          • In Brazil, soybeans can make $3,000  per hectare for clearing forests
          • 1/2 of deforestation in Africa is carried out by subsistence farmers
        • Biodiversity
          • Services
            • Regulates temperature
            • Stops soil erosion
            • Regulates water cycle
            • Habitat
            • Carbon sink
            • Gene pool
          • Goods
            • Timber
            • Soya beans
            • Brazil nut
            • Medicine
      • Via deforestation
        • Globally, deforestation releases more Carbon Dioxide than all types of transport combined
          • The UN
        • Debt for nature swaps
          • It frees up debt if the country promises not to cut the rain-forest down.
        • Ecosystems can be destroyed
        • More rapid run off of rainfall
        • Increased soil erosion and the risk of flooding
    • Ecological footprint is a measure of the amount of land and water that a population needs in order to produce the resources that it consumes and to absorb its waste, with existing technology
  • Economic
    • At the current economic growth, we will need two planet's worth of natural resources by 2050.
      • Environmental
        • Vast amount of areas are destroyed
          • Expand cities
          • Build cities
          • e.g. cattle ranches
            • McDonalds
          • (forests)
            • Need for fuel
            • Mineral reserve
              • 2nd biggest iron mine in the Amazon
            • Timber was shipped away
              • e.g. Mahogany
                • $12,000 dollars for a Mahogany tree
                • One of the biggest importers for Mahogany is the UK
            • Tropical rain forests cover less than 5% of the Earth yet they are biodiversity hotspots
              • Hold 1/2 of the known species
              • At the current rate, the forests will be gone within 50 years.
                • By the WWF
            • Food
              • In Brazil, soybeans can make $3,000  per hectare for clearing forests
              • 1/2 of deforestation in Africa is carried out by subsistence farmers
            • Biodiversity
              • Services
                • Regulates temperature
                • Stops soil erosion
                • Regulates water cycle
                • Habitat
                • Carbon sink
                • Gene pool
              • Goods
                • Timber
                • Soya beans
                • Brazil nut
                • Medicine
          • Via deforestation
            • Globally, deforestation releases more Carbon Dioxide than all types of transport combined
              • The UN
            • Debt for nature swaps
              • It frees up debt if the country promises not to cut the rain-forest down.
            • Ecosystems can be destroyed
            • More rapid run off of rainfall
            • Increased soil erosion and the risk of flooding
        • Ecological footprint is a measure of the amount of land and water that a population needs in order to produce the resources that it consumes and to absorb its waste, with existing technology
  • Social
    • Tourism is the world's biggest industry with over 800 million international tourists in 2010
      • Economic
        • At the current economic growth, we will need two planet's worth of natural resources by 2050.
        • 1/4 of the jobs are directly or indirectly influenced by tourism in the world.
        • It allows tourists to travel to exotic and distant locations
        • The growth of tourism has been and still is the major driving force behind globalisation
      • Developing countries see the tourist industry as means of development
      • CASE STUDY: Cuba
        • Varadero is Cuba's most famous resort
          • 40% of the tourists that visit Cuba stay in Varadero
          • 140km from the capital Havana
          • Also known as Playa Azul
            • 'Blue Beach' in Spanish
          • It has its own airport
        • 1 million tourists in 2009
        • There is a Varahicaos Ecological Reserve
        • There is a harbour at the south penisula
        • The coast is densely populated with hotels
        • REPATRIATION OF PROFITS
          • Money is leaked back home
            • e.g. Iberostar
        • TOURIST ENCLAVE
          • Tourists stay in their resort and don't benefit the local economy.
        • ADVANTAGES OF TOURISM +
          • Taxes on tourists
          • Virgin Atlantic Airways began direct flights to Cuba
          • Income supports economic development
        • DISADVANTAGES OF TOURISM -
          • ADVANTAGES OF TOURISM +
            • Taxes on tourists
            • Virgin Atlantic Airways began direct flights to Cuba
            • Income supports economic development
          • Average salary is only $20 a month
          • Locals become dependent on tourism which is a very volatile industry
          • Loss of Cuban culture
          • Profits repaturated
        • In 2004, a new tourist currency was devised -the Cuban convertible Peso which is  linked to the US dollar.
        • 80,000 people work in the tourist industry in Cuba.
        • In 1990, 18 foreign airlines connected to Cuba, However, in 2005, 93  foreign airlines connected to 40 capital cities including Havana.
        • EtHiCaL
          • Stay in family homes
          • Places such as Las Terrazas offer eco-tourism excursions
            • Cuba's first sustainable eco-resort developed in Pinar del Rio (west of Cuba)
          • ACTIVITIES
            • Bird watching
            • Involved in biodiversity management
          • There are 263 protected areas including 6 UNESCO biospheres

    Comments

    Bethany Cunningham

    It is better to save as a PDF and zoom, sorry got carried away/ 

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