UCL Transamination Practical

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1. Pyruvate DNP…

  • often produces two spots close together (isomers). More rarely, 2 spots are seen with 2-oxoglutarate DNP as well
  • runs irregularly near the top so ignore the top spots and concentrate on the pyruvate DNP and 2-oxoglutarate DNP spots
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Other questions in this quiz

2. what’s in position 4?

  • glutamate (technically shouldn’t be there, it’s because of limiting factors)
  • Pyruvate (technically shouldn't be there, because of limiting factors)

3. What happens to the toxic ammonium ion released from the oxidative deamination of glutamate?

  • it is transported (as glutamine) to the liver, where it is converted to carbamoyl phosphate, which enters the urea cycle
  • it is transported (as glutamate) to the liver, where it is converted to carboxyl phosphate, which enters the urea cycle

4. Tubes 3 and 7, the reactants are pyruvate and glutamate and the products are oxoglutarate and alanine. What was the reaction?

  • transamination
  • deamination
  • no reaction

5. After the heart extract is minced, homogenised in an ice cold buffer, what happens?

  • it is centrifuged at 20000g x 20 minutes. The supernatant is then exhaustively dialysed (this means many changes of dialyses buffer) against ice cold buffer (0.005mol L-1 phosphate, pH 3.4)
  • it is centrifuged at 20000g x 20 minutes. The supernatant is then exhaustively dialysed (this means many changes of dialyses buffer) against ice cold buffer (0.05mol L-1 phosphate, pH 7.4)
  • it is centrifuged at 2000g x 20 minutes. The supernatant is the exhaustively dialysed (this means many changes of dialyses buffer) against ice cold buffer (0.05mol L-1 phosphate, pH 7.4)

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