The search for a Solution- Key dates

HideShow resource information
  • Created by: Faolan
  • Created on: 30-05-15 16:22
March 1973
The British Government published its proposals for a new assembly (parliament). However, it was not to be given control over security or justice. There was also to be an executive (government).
1 of 22
June 1973
The results of the Assembly elections revealed that the number of UUUC (anti power-sharing) unionists elected was greater than the number of unionists elected who supported power-sharing.
2 of 22
November 1973
Whitelaw announced that the power-sharing Executive would contain eleven ministries, all of which would go to supporters of power-sharing. Brian Faulkner would head the executive, while Gerry Fitt would be his deputy.
3 of 22
December 1973
The discussions about the Council of Ireland took place at Sunningdale in Berkshire. The meeting brought together the leading politicians from Britain, Ireland and NI. However, there were no anti power-sharing politicians present.
4 of 22
1st January 1974
The Executive took up office. Almost immediately, its future was plunged into doubt
5 of 22
4th January 1974
A meeting of the OUP’s ruling body, the Ulster Unionist Council, voted to reject the Sunningdale Agreement. Faulkner resigned as party leader and was replaced by Harry West.
6 of 22
28th February 1974
A Westminster General Election took place. With 80 per cent of the unionist vote, eleven of the twelve Northern Ireland constituencies were won by the UUUC.
7 of 22
14th May 1974
A general strike began. It was organised by the Ulster Workers’ Council (UWC), a group of Protestant trade unionists who had gained substantial amounts of political and paramilitary support. The aim was to show unionist opposition to Sunningdale
8 of 22
25th May 1974
Labour’s Harold Wilson, the new British PM, was losing patience with the situation and appeared on T.V. to denounce the strike and call its organisers ‘spongers’. This speech infuriated unionists and, more than anything ensured the strike continued
9 of 22
28th May 1974
Faulkner resigned as Chief Executive. Other unionist members of the Executive resigned with him, ending power-sharing. Having achieved its aim, the UWC ended the strike on 29 May. The Assembly was suspended on 30 May and Direct Rule was re-introduced
10 of 22
1975
Britain’s next attempt at a political solution was the Constitutional Convention. This aimed to allow local politicians to suggest their own solution.
11 of 22
November 1975
The Convention collapsed without agreement. The unionist parties proposed a return to majority rule with some minority rights. This was rejected by both the British Government and the SDLP.
12 of 22
Late 1980
The IRA began a group hunger strike as a last method of achieving their demands. This was called off in December without anything having been achieved, although the prisoners believed that a deal had been made.
13 of 22
1 March 1981
second hunger strike began, led by Bobby Sands, the IRA inmates’ Officer Commanding. This time, prisoners joined the protest at intervals so as to maximise its impact. However, although the hunger strike gained huge publicity it did not change policy
14 of 22
5th May 1981
Bobby Sands died. The strike continued until 3 October 1981, by which time nine other prisoners had died. In the same period, 61 people died as a result of violence in reaction to the deaths inside the prison.
15 of 22
1981
Sinn Féin Ard Fheis. At this party conference, the delegates approved the movement’s plan of contesting elections while also continuing to use extra-constitutional methods to achieve its aims. This became known as the ‘Armalite and Ballot Box’
16 of 22
June 1983
Westminster General Election, the party’s President, Gerry Adams, defeated Gerry Fitt for the West Belfast seat. The British Government was growing increasingly concerned that Sinn Féin might even replace the SDLP as the main nationalist party
17 of 22
May 1983
The New Ireland Forum was established by the Dublin Government in May 1983 to seek out possible solutions to the Northern Ireland problem. Attendance was limited to Ireland’s constitutional nationalist parties. Sinn Féin was excluded.
18 of 22
May 1984
The forum its report- ◆ A united Ireland achieved by agreement and consent. ◆ A federal arrangement, with parliament for the North within a united Ireland. ◆ Joint authority with London and Dublin having equal responsibility for running NI
19 of 22
19th October 1984
Margaret Thatcher’s first public response came a week after an IRA attempt to kill her at Conservative Party’s annual conference in Brighton. The Prime Minister firmly rejected all of the Forum’s proposed solutions.
20 of 22
15th November 1985
The Anglo-Irish Agreement was signed. Historians have provided different reasons as to why it was signed
21 of 22
September 1987
When the unionist leaders agreed to talk to British ministers again, it was clear that the campaign to destroy the Agreement had failed.
22 of 22

Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

The results of the Assembly elections revealed that the number of UUUC (anti power-sharing) unionists elected was greater than the number of unionists elected who supported power-sharing.

Back

June 1973

Card 3

Front

Whitelaw announced that the power-sharing Executive would contain eleven ministries, all of which would go to supporters of power-sharing. Brian Faulkner would head the executive, while Gerry Fitt would be his deputy.

Back

Preview of the back of card 3

Card 4

Front

The discussions about the Council of Ireland took place at Sunningdale in Berkshire. The meeting brought together the leading politicians from Britain, Ireland and NI. However, there were no anti power-sharing politicians present.

Back

Preview of the back of card 4

Card 5

Front

The Executive took up office. Almost immediately, its future was plunged into doubt

Back

Preview of the back of card 5
View more cards

Comments

No comments have yet been made

Similar History resources:

See all History resources »See all NI resources »