The Carbon Cycle

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First stage of carbon cycle.
PHOTOSYNTHESIS - carbon dioxide is removed from the atmosphere by green plants and algae, and the carbon is used to make carbohydrates, fats and proteins in the plants and algae.
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Second stage of carbon cycle.
Some of the carbon is returned to the atmosphere as carbon dioxide, when the plants and algae respire. Some of the carbon becomes part of the fats and proteins in animals when the plants and algae are eaten. Carbon then moves through the food chain.
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Third stage of carbon cycle.
Some of the carbon is returned to the atmosphere as carbon dioxide when the animals respire.
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Fourth stage of carbon cycle.
When plants, algae and animals die, other animals (called detritus feeders) and microorganisms feed on their remains. When these organisms respire, carbon dioxide is returned to the atmosphere.
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Fifth stage of carbon cycle.
Animals also produce waste, and this too is broken down by detritus feeders and microorganisms. Compounds in waste taken up from soil by plants as nutrients - put back into food chain again.
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Sixth stage of carbon cycle.
Some useful plants and animal products, e.g. wood and fossil fuels, are burnt (combustion). This also releases carbon dioxide back into the air.
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Card 2

Front

Second stage of carbon cycle.

Back

Some of the carbon is returned to the atmosphere as carbon dioxide, when the plants and algae respire. Some of the carbon becomes part of the fats and proteins in animals when the plants and algae are eaten. Carbon then moves through the food chain.

Card 3

Front

Third stage of carbon cycle.

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

Fourth stage of carbon cycle.

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

Fifth stage of carbon cycle.

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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