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  • Created by: gibs
  • Created on: 31-05-15 18:29
During an extra oral soft tissue assessment, what would you check for when looking at external facial signs?
skin colour/ facial symmetry/ blemishes/ moles/cold sores
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During an extra oral soft tissue assessment, what would you check for when looking at the lips?
change in colour or size/ blemishes/ abnormalities
2 of 94
During an extra oral soft tissue assessment, what would you check for when looking at the lympth nodes?
swelling/abnormailites/ infection or serious lesion
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Where do the lympth nodes lie?
under the mandible in the neck
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What are photographs used for?
record soft tissue lesions to aid diagnosis/ record extent of injury following trauma/before and after views/ record sinister lesions
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During a vitality test what is the name of the cold stimulus?
Ethyl Chloride
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During a vitality test, what is the name of the hot stimulus?
Guta-percha
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What is the name of the electrical vitality test?
Pulp tester
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What is the advantage of vitality testing?
enables the dentist to correctly determine which tooth requires treatment at that time, rather than having to treat several adjacent teeth in a quadrant before the correct ones are identified
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What is the disadvantage of vitality testing?
Patient has to experience a painful stimulus
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What material are used in an oral assessment?
alginate impression/ dental stone/ dental plaster
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What is alginate impression made up of?
calcium and alginate salts
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What colour is dental stone and what is it made up of?
yellow/ calcium sulphate
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what colour is dental plaster and what is it made up of?
white/ calcium sulphate
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What methods can be used to carry out an dental assessment?
visual inspection/ manual inspection/ use of mouth mirrors/ dental probes/ radiographs/ photographs/ study models
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What are radiographs used for?
detect dental caries/ presence and extent of periodontal disease/ periodontal and periodical abscess/ cysts/ detect supernumerary teeth and unerupted teeth./ diagnose hard tissue lesions bone cysts tumours/ jaw fractures
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What are study models used for?
occlusion analysis/ orthodontic cases/ where tooth surface loss is evident ( progression of tooth wear can be monitored and treatment determined
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What are the signs of an asthma attack?
breathless with wheezing/ cyanosis (blueness of lips)
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what are the symptoms of an asthma attack?
difficulty breathing/ sensation of suffocating or drowning
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What treatment would be given for an asthma attack?
Salbutamol inhaler/ oxygen
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What are the signs of an epileptic fit?
Sudden loss of consciousness/ tonic chronic phase casualty become rigid/ casualty convulses
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What is an symptom of an epileptic fit?
may experience an altered mood before the fit begins
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How would you treat an epileptic fit?
Make no attempt to move them
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What are the signs of an Anaphylaxis shock? (allergic reaction)
Facial swelling/ formation of a rash
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What is an symptom of an anaphylaxis shock?
sudden onset of breathing difficulties/ tingling of extremities
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What would you do to treat an anaphylaxis shock?
administer adrenaline and call 999
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What is a sign of hypoglycaemia/ diabetic coma?
trembling cold and clammy skin becoming irritable to the point of being aggressive
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What is a symptom of hypoglycaemia/ diabetic coma?
confusion disorientation
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What would you do to treat hypoglycaemia/ diabetic coma?
If concious give glucogel tube if unconscious glucagon
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What are the signs of an angina attack?
congested facial appearance/ casualty clutching left arm
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What are the symptoms of an angina attack?
Crushing chest pain that may travel into the left arm or jaw, nausea/ breathlessness
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How would you treat an angina attack?
Administer GTN spray
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What does code 0 stand for?
Healthy gingival tissue/ no bleeding on probe
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What does code 1 stand for?
pocket no more than 3.5 mm/ bleeding/ no calculus/ plaque retention factor present
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What does code 2 stand for?
pocket no more than 3.5mm/ plaque retention facto detected such as sub calculus
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What does code 3 stand for?
pocket present up to 5.5mm deep
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What does code 4 stand for?
Pocket present deeper than 5.5 mm but less than 7mm
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What does code * stand for?
gingival recession or furcation involvement present, pocket deeper than 7mm
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What does grade 1 stand for?
side to side tooth movement less than 2mm
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What does grade 2 stand for?
side to side tooth movement more than 2mm
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What does grade 3 stand for?
vertical movement present
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What is palmer notation?
|_2 3_|
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What is FDI stand for?
international dental federation
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What does BPE stand for?
basic periodontal assessment
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What dental instruments would you use to carry out a tooth charting assessment?
mouth mirror/ angled probe/ tweezers/ briault probe
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What is stomatitis?
inflam condition of the oral cavity/ mucous appears red inflamed/ candida infection- effects the elderly and denture wearers
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What is angular cheilitis?
inflammation of the corners (angles) of the mouth
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What is glossitis?
inflammation of the tongue
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What is burning mouth syndrome?
occurs in older women and is described as the oral cavity feeling on fire
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what does scc stand for?
squamous cell carcinoma
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What can cause oral cancer?
tabacco habbits/ high alcohol consumption/ sunlight/ diet/ genetics
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What are the signs of SCC?
painless ulcer which fails to heal after 2-3weeks/ appearing beneath or side of the tongue/ presence of a white or red patch
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What medical conditions can affect the oral tissue?
Epilepsy ( drug can affect gingival tissue growth) Eating disorders ( enamel erosion/ soft tissue burns) digestive disorders (chrons disease/ ulcerative colitis/ coeliac disease)
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What are the signs of a faint?
pale and clammy skin/ weak and thready pulse/ loss of consciousness
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What are the symptoms of a faint?
dizziness/ tunnel vision/ nausea
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How would you treat a faint?
lie casualty flat with legs raised above the head to restore blood flow
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What are minor aphthous ulcers?
Small shallow/ painful/ heal within 14 days and cause no scaring
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What are major aphthous ulcers?
Larger/ painful ulcers that take weeks or months to heal and cause no scaring
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Herpetiform ulcers
very small multiple ulcers that occur sometimes up to a 100 at a time
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What is oral candidiasis?
commonly occurring infection with the fungus candida albicans. producing a transient white patch
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What is Leukoplakia?
A white patch that has no obvious local cause/ premalignant
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What is Erythroplakia?
A red patch on the oral mucosa in isolation or sometime adjacent to an area of leukoplakia/ sinister sign of premalignancy
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What medical conditions can effect the oral tissue?
Herpes simplex type I / herpes labialis/ herpes zooster/ HIV (present as an oral legion) Hepatitis (cross infection from needle stick) Diabetes
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What can diabetes cause?
xerostomia/ poor wound healing/ infection
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What emergency drug would you take for an asthma attack?
Salbutamol
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What emergency drug would you take for an anaphylaxis?
adrenaline
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What emergency drug would you take for an epileptic fit?
oxygen/ midazolam/
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What emergency drug would you take for an hypoglycaemia?
glucogel ( concious) gucagon (unconscious)
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What emergency drug would you take for an angina?
GTN metered dose
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What emergency drug would you take for an myocardial infraction?
asprin
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What would you check for an inta-oral soft tissue assessment?
labial/buccal and sulcus mucosa/ palatial mucosa/ tongue/ floor of mouth
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Why would you carry out an oral health assessment?
prevention of disease/ early detection and diagnosis when disease is already present/
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What oral diseases are checked during an oral health assessment?
Dental caries/ chronic gingivitis/ chronic periodontal disease
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Which glad is located between the ramus of the mandible and the ear?
Parotid glands
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Which glad is found at the floor or the mouth?
submandibular salivary glands
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Which glad is found at the floor of the mouth?
Sublingual salivary glands
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Which is the largest of the three major salivary glands and is affected by the viral infection mumps?
Parotid gland
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which duct connects the parotid gland to the oral cavity?
Stenson duct
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where is the sumandibular gland found?
posterior region of the floor of the mouth
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what duct does the submandibular gland use?
warton duct
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What is the warton duct most likely to be blocked by?
salivary stones
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What nerve is it innervated by?
facial nerve
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Which gland lies further forward in the floor of the mouth?
sublingual gland
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which nerve is the sublingual gland inverted by?
facial nerve
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What neutralises dietary acids?
Minerals
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What are the four main muscles of mastercation?
Temporalis/ masseter/ lateral pterygoid/ medial pterygoid
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What does the temporalis do?
pulls the mandible backwards and closed
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What does the masseter do?
closes the mandible
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What does the lateral pterygoid gald do?
brings the mandible forwards to bite tip to tip
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what does the medial pterygoid do?
closes the mandible
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What does the inferior dental nerve do?
supplies sensation from all of the lower teeth and from the buccal or labial gingive of all except the moalr teeth. supplies sensation from the soft tissue of the lower lip and chin
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What does the lingual nerve do?
supplies sensation to the lower teeth/ floor of mouth/ touch sensation from the anterior two thirds of the tongue
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what does the long buccal nerve do?
supplies sensation to the buccal gingivae of the lower molar teeth
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What does the motor branch do?
Supplies stimulation to the muscles of mastercation to effect the jaw closing and chewing movements
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

During an extra oral soft tissue assessment, what would you check for when looking at the lips?

Back

change in colour or size/ blemishes/ abnormalities

Card 3

Front

During an extra oral soft tissue assessment, what would you check for when looking at the lympth nodes?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

Where do the lympth nodes lie?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

What are photographs used for?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
View more cards

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