Product Design Revision 2018

What is Anthropometrics?
Measurements of the human body which are used by Designers
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What is Ergonomics?
The relationship between the consumer and the product and how comfortable the product is for the consumer
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What is planned obsolescence?
When a product is planned to only be useful for a certain amount of time
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What is a negative about planned obsolescence?
The environment suffers as resources are wasted, some wasted components may not be recyclable and more energy is needed to gain raw materials
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Why would a manufacturer choose to have a product which has planned obsolescence?
A consumer will have to rebuy the manufacturers product, resulting in more money for the manufacturer
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What is an example of a product with planned obsolescence?
Textbooks, as they change the content slightly each year to make the previous year's textbook appear useless
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What are the 6R's?
Recycle, Refuse, Reduce, Reuse, Repair, Rethink
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What does Refuse mean in the 6R's?
Refuse means to refuse products which are not recyclable, such as plastic bags
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What is Tecnology Push?
Re-Designing products because of new materials or manufacturing techniques being available
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What is Market Pull?
Product Ideas being produced by market forces, such as consumers asking for new products or a competing companies producing rival products
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What is a development lab?
A place where new ideas, products and improvements are create
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What is 3D Printing?
The process of making a physical object from a 3D digital model, usually, by building up layers of a material
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What are advantages of 3D printing?
Low labor costs, exact and precise scale models and being able to achieve difficult to make parts
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What is Stereolithography?
A laser beam, which is controlled by a computer, hardening a liquid polymer resin which builds up a model of three dimensional plans which are created on computers
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What is an Orthographic view?
The two dimensional drawing of a three dimensional object
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What best describes the Arts and Crafts Movement of 1850-1914?
Simple forms and linear shape, Inspired by natural forms, high-quality materials being utilised and an interest in gothic and medieval art
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What best describes the Modernism Movement of 1880-1940?
Using new materials, having simple forms with no decorative elements, being functional and having natural colours
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What best describes the Art Deco Movement of 1910-1939?
Geometric shapes with round corners, having materials like chrome, ivory and bronze, recurring designs (a motif), having bright colours and being inspired by historical themes
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What best describes the Bauhaus movement of 1919-1933?
Regular repetitive forms, using new materials, the form being derived (which means coming from) function, no decoration
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What description best describes the Minimalism movement of 1967-1978
Simplicity, harmonious design, elegancy, open-space (avoiding inner-walls), Basic geometric shapes and having a very small amount of furniture
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What best describes the Art Nouveau movement of 1880-1910?
Curved lines and Organic shapes, non-geometrical, used asymmetry, inspired by Japanese culture and used bright but delicate colour schemes
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What best describes the Pop Art Movement of 1958-1972?
Uses bright colours which are expressive, plastics are used, repetitive design, inspired by comics and used celebrities
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What are Synthetic Fibres?
Man made textiles, such as: Kevlar, Nylon and Lycra
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What are Natural Fibres?
Wool, Cotton and Linen
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What is a Composite?
Two materials bonded together to improve their properties, such as Concrete and Plywood
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What is an Alloy?
A mixture of two elements, one of the elements is a metal (Brass-Copper and Zinc, Steel-Iron and Carbon)
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What is Product Evolution?
Existing products developing due to Market Pull and Technology Push
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What is Product Analysis?
Looking and comparing different products to see what works in particular products and what doesn't, this is to make better products
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What does CNC stand for?
Computer Numerical Code-the process in which information is sent through CAD software to CAM hardware
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What are the benefits of ICT in manufacture?
Video Conferencing, such as Skype and Facetime, mean that international calls can take place between manufacturers resulting in the lack of need to travel (saving money) and software is available that allows you to build and produce a physical model.
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What is EDI? (Electronic Data Interchange)
The transfer of data from one computer to another without human intervention, resulting in orders being quickly placed and no human errors
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What is Stock Control?
Managing the amount of Stock held by monitoring what is ordered and what is sold
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

What is Ergonomics?

Back

The relationship between the consumer and the product and how comfortable the product is for the consumer

Card 3

Front

What is planned obsolescence?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

What is a negative about planned obsolescence?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

Why would a manufacturer choose to have a product which has planned obsolescence?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
View more cards

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