plasticity and functional recovery of the brain

  • Created by: IvyVega
  • Created on: 07-06-18 17:15
the brain is plastic-synaptic connections form and are pruned- brain plasticity
during infancy the brain experiences a rapid growth in synaptic connections, peaking at about 15000 at age 2-3 years.rarely used connections are deleted and frequently are strengthened- synaptic pruning. changes were limited to childhood.
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the concept of plasticity is supported by studies- brain plasticity
Maguire et al found significantly more volume of grey matter in the posterior hippocampus in London taxi drivers than in a matched control group. linked with the development of spatial and navigational skills.
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plasticity is also supported by other research- brain plasticity
draganski et al imaged the brains of medical students three months before and after final exams. learning induced parietal cortex, presumably as a result of the exam.
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following trauma unaffected areas of the brain take over lost functions
functional recovery of the brain after trauma is an important example of neural plasticity- healthy brain areas take over functions of areas damaged, destroyed or even missing. neuroscientists suggest this process occurs quickly after trauma.
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the brain rewires itself by forming new synaptic connections
the brain is able to rewire and reorganise itself by forming new synaptic connections close to the area of damage. secondary neural pathways that would not typically be used to carry out certain functions are activated or unmasked to enable function
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structural changes in the brain
further structural changes may include: axonal sprouting- growth of new nerve endings which connect with other undamaged cells to form new neuronal pathways. reformation of blood vessels, recruitment of homologous areas- perform certain tasks
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strength 1- practical application
understanding processes involved in plasticity has contributed to the field of neurorehabilitation. this shows that although the brain may have the capacity to fix itself to a point this process requires further intervention if it is to be successful
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strength 2- animal studies
hubel and wiesel sewed one eye of a kitten shut and analysed the brains cortical responses. the area of the visual cortex associated with the shut eye was not idle but continued to process information from the open eye.
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Maguire et al found significantly more volume of grey matter in the posterior hippocampus in London taxi drivers than in a matched control group. linked with the development of spatial and navigational skills.

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the concept of plasticity is supported by studies- brain plasticity

Card 3

Front

draganski et al imaged the brains of medical students three months before and after final exams. learning induced parietal cortex, presumably as a result of the exam.

Back

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Card 4

Front

functional recovery of the brain after trauma is an important example of neural plasticity- healthy brain areas take over functions of areas damaged, destroyed or even missing. neuroscientists suggest this process occurs quickly after trauma.

Back

Preview of the back of card 4

Card 5

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the brain is able to rewire and reorganise itself by forming new synaptic connections close to the area of damage. secondary neural pathways that would not typically be used to carry out certain functions are activated or unmasked to enable function

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