Pituitary Gland

How does the PG develop?
The lobes develop from 2 embryologically distinct ectodermal tissues - Posterior lobe arises from an invagination of the diencephalon (forebrain). An outgrowth from the roof of the mouth known as Rathke's pouch forms the anterior pituitary lobe
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What controls the PL?
Neuronal projections from the brain - in particular the supraoptic nucleus and paraventricular nucleus
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What controls the AL?
Hypothalamic hypophysiotrophic hormones, feedback loops from target glands, circadian rhythms, seasonal rhythms and reproductive cycles
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What were the effects of the hypophysectomies performed by Smith on rats in the 1930s?
Stopped lactation and growth; led to atrophy of the adrenal gland, gonads, and thyroid; disturbed salt/water balance, carbohydrate and protein metabolism; ultimately led to their deaths
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Why was it realised that the PG is not autonomous?
Brain lesion studies showed changes in pituitary gland hormone levels indicating influence of the central nervous system
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What are the five different endocrine cell types in the AL?
Gonadotroph cells, lactotroph cells, corticotroph cells, somatotroph cells, thyrotroph cells
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Name six fully established hormones released by the PG
TSH, ACTH, FSH, LH, GH, PRL
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

What controls the PL?

Back

Neuronal projections from the brain - in particular the supraoptic nucleus and paraventricular nucleus

Card 3

Front

What controls the AL?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

What were the effects of the hypophysectomies performed by Smith on rats in the 1930s?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

Why was it realised that the PG is not autonomous?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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