Physics P3 2.2 Centre of mass.

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What is the centre of mass of an object?
It is that point where its mass can be thought to be concentrated.
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When is a suspended object in equilibrium?
When its centre of mass is directly beneath the point of suspension.
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Where is the centre of mass of a symmetrical object?
Along the axis of symmetry.
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How can you find the centre of mass of a thin irregular sheet of a material?
Freely suspend sheet with a pin in a clamp stand so it is able to turn. When it rests hang a plumbline from the same pin. Mark plumbline position against sheet. Repeat with the pin at another point on sheet. Centre of mass is where lines cross.
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What does the position of the centre of mass depend on?
The shape of the object, and sometimes lies outside the object.
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Where is the centre of mass on an object that has more than one axis of symmetry?
Where the axes of symmetry meet.
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Where is the centre of mass of an object?
The point where the mass of the object can be thought to be concentrated.
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Where is the centre of mass of a symmetrical object?
Along the axis of symmetry.
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**MAKE SURE THAT YOU CAN DESCRIBE THE EXPERIMENT TO FIND THE CENTRE OF MASS OF A THIN SHEET OF A MATERIAL INCLUDING SKETCHING A LABELLED DIAGRAM**
**LOOK UP SYMMETRICAL OBJECTS AND THE EXPERIMENT FOR FINDING THE CENTRE OF MASS OF A CARD**
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Card 2

Front

When is a suspended object in equilibrium?

Back

When its centre of mass is directly beneath the point of suspension.

Card 3

Front

Where is the centre of mass of a symmetrical object?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

How can you find the centre of mass of a thin irregular sheet of a material?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

What does the position of the centre of mass depend on?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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