Metaphysical poetry Critical Opinions

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Andrew Marvell: To His Coy Mistress
S. Speaker- "Marvell includes landscape, religious, and sexual metaphors to illustrate the love he has for this woman, even though their time will eventually run out."
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John Donne: To his Mistress Going to Bed
Helena Carr- "His urgent imperatives dramatise the contradiction of the 'masculine persuasive force'."
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John Donne
David Buck Beliles- "Donne's representation of masculinity represented a break from the Petrarchan tradition of the "lovesick lover.""
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John Donne: The Sun Rising
Jane Mueller- "Donne's many cynical and libertine speakers enact their conviction of male superiority"
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George Herbert: Love III
John Drury- "The whole thing is replete with biblical references"
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George Herbert: Love III
John Drury- "Seventeenth century readers...were more likely to notice this wonderful feat of condensation...than we are"
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Women Context
Germain Greer- "A wife who knew how to brew good ale saved many a family from going to the wall...but no 'poetress' ever starved off destitution by her literary efforts"
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John Donne: Song
James Winny- "emotional engagement is there, in the rough language and uneven phrasing of...passionate statement"
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John Donne: Song
James Winny- "Donne's...impudence and originality of his writing" captivates the reader although the poem is seen to be misogynistic.
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Katherine Philips: Orinda to Lucasia
Mimi Goodall- "The poetry of Katherine Philips engages with the platonic and soulful friendship between women, which previously had only be considered between men"
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Katherine Philips: Orinda to Lucasia
Webster Garret- "Such love being an integral part of life"
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Carol Ann Duffy: Rapture
Margaret Renyolds- "Rapture is sad, but not bleak"
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CAD: Text
Kate Kellaway- "a wonderful self-mocking poem"
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John Donne: Batter My Heart
Unknown: "It might seem shocking to use such explicit human terminology for spiritual unfaithfulness"
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George Herbert: The Collar
eNotes Study Guide: "'The Collar' gives full expression to the speaker’s resentment of the pain and rigor of leading a life that is moral and holy. "
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John Donne: The Good Morrow
James Winny: "Donne's writing is perhaps to be understood as an attempt to make out of poetry a form of imaginative reality...more secure than Donne found in the world about him"
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

Helena Carr- "His urgent imperatives dramatise the contradiction of the 'masculine persuasive force'."

Back

John Donne: To his Mistress Going to Bed

Card 3

Front

David Buck Beliles- "Donne's representation of masculinity represented a break from the Petrarchan tradition of the "lovesick lover.""

Back

Preview of the back of card 3

Card 4

Front

Jane Mueller- "Donne's many cynical and libertine speakers enact their conviction of male superiority"

Back

Preview of the back of card 4

Card 5

Front

John Drury- "The whole thing is replete with biblical references"

Back

Preview of the back of card 5
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