Inorganic fibres

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  • Created by: Steff06
  • Created on: 08-06-16 17:01
What have glass fibres originated from?
Powdered compounds of mineral origin.
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How have glass fibres been reinforced?
With polyester
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How are glass fibres kept pliable?
By being painted with silicon.
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What are the positives about glass fibres?
Durable, strong, shatterproof, heat and old resistant, good electrical properties, non-stick, non-toxic.
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What are negative surrounding the use of glass fibres?
Poor abrasion resistance,requires a surface finish to reduce skin irritation.
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What are glass fibres used for?
Aerospace and military industries, flame and heat barriers, roof coverings, sterile hospital wall coverings, outerwear protective garments.
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Describe the care requirements of glass fibres
Machine washable, can bleach, can be dry-cleaned, can be tumbled-dryed.
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Describe what fibre glass is made of?
Fine fibres of glass.
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What is fibre glass used as?
Used as an insulation material, a strengthening product and for flame retardant fabrics.
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How are carbon fibres made?
By burning acrylic to produce carbon.
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What has carbon fibre been made to replace?
Used to replace metals.
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What are the positives surrounding carbon fibres?
Very strong, lightweight, abrasion resistant, flame retardant, resistant to chemicals, lightweight.
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What are the negatives about carbon fibres?
They are a non-renewable source, expensive.
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Describe the end uses of carbon fibres
Transport, upholstery, civil engineering, aerospace, sports products, protective clothing for emergency services.
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Explain the aftercare required for carbon fibres
Machine washable, can bleach, can be dry-cleaned and tumble dried.
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What are graphite fibres?
Extremely thin, composed of mostly carbon atoms.
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How do the carbon atoms become a yarn?
Atoms bonded together in crystals. Fibres are twisted together to form a yarn.
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What is mostly used for metallic fibres?
Aluminium, copper and steel.
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What is used for more expensive uses?
Silver and gold.
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How is a metallic yarn produced?
Thin sheet of metal cut in strips or fine wire. Metal thread spun around yarn.
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What has been recently used?
Lurex (metallised, polyester yarn) coated with fine plastic to prevent tarnishing.
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What are the positives of using metallic fibres?
Strong, lightweight, abrasion resistant, conductive, anti-static, protective
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What are the end uses of metallic fibres?
Decorative textiles, active sportswear, work wear, medical end uses.
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Describe the after care required for metallic fibres
Can be washed and tumble dried.
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What are ceramic fibres made of?
Powdered compounds of metal oxide, meta carbide, metal nitride or their mixtures.
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What can ceramics content fibres regulate?
Can regulate body temperature - warmer in cold temperatures, colder in warm.
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What are the positives of ceramic fibres
Provides UV protection, good insulation, good insulation, lightweight, low thermal conductivity, resistant to chemicals.
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What are the end uses of ceramic fibres?
Swimwear, UV protective clothing, industrial work wear, electrical, thermal and sound insulation.
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Describe the aftercare required for ceramic fibres
Machine washable, can bleach, can be dry-cleaned and tumble dried.
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What temperatures can ceramics withstand?
Up to 1000 degrees.
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How can ceramics be incorporated into synthetic fibres?
Either by coating them with ceramic particles or by encapsulating them within the fibre.
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What are inorganic fibres made from?
Mainly by inorganic chemicals based on natural elements.
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Where are these materials for inorganic fibres found?
Found in the Earth's crust.
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

How have glass fibres been reinforced?

Back

With polyester

Card 3

Front

How are glass fibres kept pliable?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

What are the positives about glass fibres?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

What are negative surrounding the use of glass fibres?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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