27. In Ecclesiis - Gabrieli

HideShow resource information
When was the composer of this work born and when did he die?
Gabrieli was born in Venice in 1555, and died in 1612.
1 of 34
What connection did Gabrieli have to St. Mark's?
He served as the organist in 1585.
2 of 34
What special characteristics did music originating from St. Mark's have?
An instrumental ensemble was formed in 1568 and participated on equal terms with vocal performers.
3 of 34
Which techniques were developed in the final years of the 16th century (Seconda Prattica)?
Basso continuo, increased use of chromaticism, more elaborate writing for solo voices, more idiomatic writing for instruments, a tendency to write more homophonically than contrapuntally.
4 of 34
How is the instrumentation special?
The piece uses two four part choral groups, as well as an instrumental section.
5 of 34
Which instruments did the instrumental group consist of?
3 cornetts, a violino (basically a viola) and two trombones.
6 of 34
When is the instrumental group first heard?
In bar 31, with a short section for instruments only.
7 of 34
Which instruments accompany the first 30 bars of music?
The continuo instruments.
8 of 34
What is monody?
The early Baroque texture of melody and continuo accompaniment.
9 of 34
Which other textures are used in this work?
Polyphony (with some imitative counterpoint), homophony, antiphony, duets and contrapuntal texture.
10 of 34
What is the best way to describe the structure of this piece?
Rondo-like with a refrain between each section and an instrumental sinfonia after the second refrain.
11 of 34
Where are the sections?
A (bars 1-5), B (bars 6-12), C (bars 13-24), B (bars 25-30), Sinfonia (bars 31-8), D (bars 38-62), B (bars 63-7), E (bars 68-94), B (bars 95-101), F (bars 102-118), B (with extension, bar 119-end).
12 of 34
What is important about the refrains?
They are subject to variation in use of resources.
13 of 34
Which kind of structure does this arrangement link to?
This structure has far outgrown the 16th century motet and points towards the Baroque cantata with its succession of short movements.
14 of 34
Which key is this piece generally in?
A minor.
15 of 34
Where is the shift to C found?
Bar 14.
16 of 34
Where are there passing references to G minor?
Bars 43 and 46.
17 of 34
Where is the more distant key of B minor used?
Bars 48-49.
18 of 34
What is important about the ii7b chord in bar 3 beat 4?
It may be editorial, but a similar chord is produced in bar 33 beat 4.
19 of 34
In which bar does the music switch from major to minor after a perfect cadence?
Bar 34 beat 2.
20 of 34
Where are unprepared dominant 7ths found?
Bars 104, 105, 110, 111 and 113.
21 of 34
Where is an example of false relations?
Between the F and F# at bar 102.
22 of 34
Conjunct lines are used throughout the piece, but what is the name of the note that acts as an "escape note"?
An echappee. (Bar 2).
23 of 34
Where is a repetition of short motifs found?
In bars 3-5.
24 of 34
Where are sequential repetitions found?
There is a descending one in bars 13-17, and an ascending one in bars 17-19.
25 of 34
Which bars use florid ornamentation most notably?
Bars 68-9, which is arguably a decorated version of the opening line inverted.
26 of 34
How can the rhythm throughout the entire piece be described?
There is enormous rhythmic variety throughout.
27 of 34
What are the longest and shortest note lengths used and where are they found?
Breve (i.e. bar 129) is the longest, demisemiquaver (bars 116-117) is the shortest.
28 of 34
Which two metres are juxtaposed?
4/2 and 3/4. 3/4 is mainly confined to the first 4 bars of the refrain, but also appears in the section for countertenor and baritone duet (Bars 79-90).
29 of 34
Which metre provides a sense of grandeur?
3/1.
30 of 34
Although the lyrics of this set work appear to be anonymous, what is interesting about their origins?
They were probably a compilation, either by the composer, or perhaps by one of the clergy.
31 of 34
Which word makes up the majority of the chorus?
"Alleluia", except for "Deus adjutor noster in Aeternum" ("God is our keeper for ever more", bars 102-115, the climax of the work).
32 of 34
How does the text relate to word painting?
There are not many opportunities for this, but it is nonetheless clear that the composer matches his musical ideas with the idea of projecting their emotional force.
33 of 34
How does the word setting generally respect the natural stresses of the Latin language?
Accented syllables fall on stronger beats (i.e. bars 17-19 "dominationis", bars 41-46 "salutari", and bar 51, "auxilium").
34 of 34

Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

What connection did Gabrieli have to St. Mark's?

Back

He served as the organist in 1585.

Card 3

Front

What special characteristics did music originating from St. Mark's have?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

Which techniques were developed in the final years of the 16th century (Seconda Prattica)?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

How is the instrumentation special?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
View more cards

Comments

No comments have yet been made

Similar Music resources:

See all Music resources »See all Developing Musical Understanding resources »