Susceptibility to disease

  • Created by: Ali682
  • Created on: 27-11-17 17:53
How many types of cancers are there?
There are 200 types of cancers
1 of 27
What is cancer?
Cancer is a cell disease that results in them becoming abnormal and dividing to make even more abnormal cells.
2 of 27
Who gets cancer?
Over one and a half million new cancer cases are diagnosed each year. Anyone can get cancer at any age, but the risk goes up with age. Nearly 9 out of 10 cancers are diagnosed in people ages 50 and older.
3 of 27
What is the risk of developing cancer?
The risk of developing most types of cancer can be reduced by changes in a person’s lifestyle, for instance, by staying away from tobacco, limiting time in the sun, and being physically active and eating healthy foods.
4 of 27
What causes cancer?
Some cancers are caused by things people do or expose themselves to. For example, tobacco use can cause cancer of the lungs, mouth, throat, bladder, kidneys, and many other organs. Radiation can cause cancer.
5 of 27
How is cancer treated?
Surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation are the 3 main types of cancer treatment.
6 of 27
Chemo side effects
Short-term (and often treatable) side effects of chemo can include things like nausea and vomiting, appetite loss, hair loss, and mouth sores.
7 of 27
Radiation side effects
Radiation treatments are much like x-rays and are not painful. The most common side effects are skin irritation in the treatment area and fatigue.
8 of 27
What is diabetes?
Diabetes is a serious life long health condition that occurs when the amount of glucose in the blood is to high because the body cannot use it properly.
9 of 27
What are the two types of diabetes?
Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes
10 of 27
What is type 1 diabetes?
Type 1 diabetes is a serious, lifelong condition where your blood glucose level is too high because your body can't make a hormone called insulin.
11 of 27
What causes Type 1 diabetes?
We don’t know exactly what causes Type 1 diabetes. But we do know it’s not caused by your lifestyle – it’s an autoimmune condition. This means that your body attacks and destroys the cells that make insulin, so the body stops making it.
12 of 27
Who gets type 1 diabetes?
You can have type 1 diabetes at any point that your pancreas completely ceases to produce insulin to regulate glucose levels, although most people diagnosed with type 1 diabetes are usually children or young adults.
13 of 27
What are the symptoms of type 1 diabetes?
1.Extreme weakness and/or tiredness 2.Extreme thirst—dehydration 3.Increased urination 4.Abdominal pain 5.Nausea and/or vomiting 6.Blurry vision 7.Wounds that don’t heal well 8.Irritability or quick mood changes 9.What Changes to menstruation
14 of 27
What is type 2 diabetes?
Type 2 diabetes is a serious, lifelong condition where your blood glucose level is too high. This is because your body doesn't make enough of a hormone called insulin, or the insulin doesn't work properly.
15 of 27
What causes Type 2 diabetes?
We don’t know exactly what causes Type 2 diabetes. But we do know that your family history, age and ethnic background affects your risk of developing it, and we know you’re more likely to develop it if you’re overweight.
16 of 27
What are the symptoms of type 2 diabetes?
Fatigue, Extreme thirst, Frequent urination, Extreme hunger, Weight loss, Frequent infections, Slow wound healing, Blurry vision
17 of 27
How is type 2 diabetes treated?
Type 2 diabetes is treated with a combination of healthy meal planning, physical activity, medications, and perhaps insulin.
18 of 27
What is cholesterol?
Cholesterol is a fatty substance known as a lipid and is vital for the normal functioning of the body. It's mainly made by the liver, but can also be found in some foods.
19 of 27
What are the two main types of lipoprotein?
High density lipoprotein and Low density lipoprotein
20 of 27
What is high density lipoprotein?
Carries cholesterol away from the cells and back to the liver, where it's either broken down or passed out of the body as a waste product; for this reason, HDL is referred to as "good cholesterol", and higher levels are better.
21 of 27
What is low density lipoprotein?
Carries cholesterol to the cells that need it, but if there's too much cholesterol for the cells to use, it can build up in the artery walls, leading to disease of the arteries; for this reason, LDL is known as "bad cholesterol"
22 of 27
What increases the chance of high blood cholesterol?
Lifestyle factors such as unhealthy diet, smoking or lack of exercise increase the chance of having a high blood cholesterol level for most people.
23 of 27
Another reason for high blood cholesterol?
Another reason for high cholesterol levels is an inherited condition that runs in families, known as familial hypercholesterolaemia. In the UK, approximately 1 in 600 people have this condition.
24 of 27
Why is Cholesterol Important?
Cholesterol is essential for the body because it produces bile acid, vitamin D, and steroid hormones; however, excessive cholesterol in the blood may be harmful. Cholesterol is recycled by way of being first excreted by the liver through the bile, f
25 of 27
What Affects Cholesterol Levels?
Age and Gender, Genes and Ethnicity
26 of 27
What Makes Cholesterol Levels Go Up?
Eating foods such as red meat, whole milk dairy products, egg yolks, and some kinds of fish can make your cholesterol levels go up.
27 of 27

Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

What is cancer?

Back

Cancer is a cell disease that results in them becoming abnormal and dividing to make even more abnormal cells.

Card 3

Front

Who gets cancer?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

What is the risk of developing cancer?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

What causes cancer?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
View more cards

Comments

No comments have yet been made

Similar Health & Social Care resources:

See all Health & Social Care resources »See all Human lifespan development resources »