Heroin

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What is heroin's mode of action?
It mimics endorphin, acting as a massive release of endorphins. Large quantities of dopamine are released, activating the dopaminergic reward pathways leading to feelings of euphoria
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What are short term effects of heroin?
Heart rate slows, breathing slows. Aches and pains disappear due to analgesic effects. The user becomes flush, warm and sweaty
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How does tolerance build in regards to heroin?
Pain-killing effects and euphoria develop tolerance quickly. Depressant effects do not develop tolerance. Regular users take heroin at a level high enough to kill a non-user
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What are psychological dependencies on heroin?
Psychologically, the prospect of coping without a fix feels worse. Family and friends no longer matter, the only focus of life is finding the next fix. Other areas of life are dissatisfying
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What are physical dependencies on heroin?
The brain rapidly gets used to the influx of heroin stimulating the dopamine reward system and flooding pain receptor sites. The addict must take fixes to avoid the increasingly severe withdrawal symptoms
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What are withdrawal symptoms of heroin?
Symptoms begin 6-12 hours after the last fix. Symptoms peak after 26-72 hours. The addict will alternate between feeling hot and cold and develops goosebumps. They will sleep for up to 12 hours then wake to cramps, vomiting and diarrhea
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What are short term effects of heroin?

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Heart rate slows, breathing slows. Aches and pains disappear due to analgesic effects. The user becomes flush, warm and sweaty

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How does tolerance build in regards to heroin?

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Card 4

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What are psychological dependencies on heroin?

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Card 5

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What are physical dependencies on heroin?

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