Germ Theory Factors - Medicine Through Time

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Economy/Government:
Both the French and Prussian economies were wealthy and industrialised and could afford to back scientists.
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Economy/Government: Pasteur
Pasteur backed by French silk and wine industries.
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War/Nationalism: Rivalry
The Franco Prussian War 1870 created a rivalry between Pasteur and Koch which spurred them forward
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War/Nationalism: Death
Pasteur's son was killed in the war - Pasteur threw himself into his work.
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War/Nationalism: Pride
It became a matter of nationalistic pride to make the most progress in germ theory.
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Technology: Microscope
Development of the microscope meant that Pasteur was able to see "microbes" and prove why Jenner's vaccination worked.
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Technology: Development
Koch's more powerful microscope allowed him to identify individual bacteria paving the way for further vaccinations and drug treatments.
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Religion:
The idea that disease could be explained "naturally" was well established in 19th century Europe.
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Religion: The Church
The Church did not overtly obstruct medical progress.
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Education:
Pasteur and Koch both had the benefit of secular university education.
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Education:
Education became an important issue in industrialised countries with most people receiving some form of basic education.
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Communications: Improvement
Means of communication such as the telegraph, trains and journals improved dramatically.
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Communications: Sharing Knowledge
Pasteur, Koch and others such as Lister were able to communicate their ideas widely and quickly.
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Communications:
Specialist medical/scientific journals such as the "Lancet" emerged.
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

Pasteur backed by French silk and wine industries.

Back

Economy/Government: Pasteur

Card 3

Front

The Franco Prussian War 1870 created a rivalry between Pasteur and Koch which spurred them forward

Back

Preview of the back of card 3

Card 4

Front

Pasteur's son was killed in the war - Pasteur threw himself into his work.

Back

Preview of the back of card 4

Card 5

Front

It became a matter of nationalistic pride to make the most progress in germ theory.

Back

Preview of the back of card 5
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