Farrington - Disrupted Families

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What was the aim of Farrington's study?
To document the duration of offending behaviour from childhood to adulthood in families
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List three pieces of information about the participants used in Farrington's study
Any of the five: 411 boys, white, working class, aged 8 & 9 and located in East London
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How did Farrington collected his data?
By using self-reports (collecting both qualitative and quantitative data)
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List three specific ways Farrington collected data on the participant's behaviour
Any from the five: Questionnaires from teachers, criminal records, information gained through families, interview & tests of participants and school reports.
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In Farrington's findings, what did the most chronic offenders all have in common?
They all shared similar childhood characteristics: low popularity, convicted parents, young mothers and large family sizes
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Give one other finding from Farrington's study
Any of the two: Those participants who began committing crimes at 14-16 committed an average of 6 crimes OR Those who started committing crime at 10-13 were nearly all reconvicted
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What did Farrington conclude from his results?
Early invention programmes for under 10s could be significant when reducing crime
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Card 2

Front

List three pieces of information about the participants used in Farrington's study

Back

Any of the five: 411 boys, white, working class, aged 8 & 9 and located in East London

Card 3

Front

How did Farrington collected his data?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

List three specific ways Farrington collected data on the participant's behaviour

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

In Farrington's findings, what did the most chronic offenders all have in common?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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