English Literature: An Inspector Call Theme - Young and Old

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How does Priestley represent Arthur and Sybil Birling - the older generation as having? Describe these views.
As having very traditional views, they think they know best, that children should not be seen or heard, and they don't like their authority to challenged.
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Which class do the older generation represent? (Hint - not the middle class!)
The ruling class.
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What does Priestley do by questioning the older generation's old-fashioned personal views?
It means their obsession with social class is also questioned - he's suggesting that the whole class system is out of touch and needs to be reformed.
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What is there a chance for because the younger generation learn their lesson?
An equal and fairer society in the future.
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What has happened between the younger and older generation by the end of the play?
Eric is standing around as if her wants nothing to do with his parents, and Sheila is standing with him. They are no longer controlled by their parents.
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Theme learning - what do Sheila and Eric learn they are responsible for?
Their actions and that their decisions affect other people.
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How is the younger generation shown?
As challenging the authority of their elders. This threatens Birling who says they'd "better keep quiet"
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What three characteristics does Eva - younger generation - have?
ambitious, determined and motivated.
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What does Arthur do because she "had a lot to say - far too much"
Sacked her from his company, because of her courage.
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What generation is Gerald in? Explain.
He's the oldest young man around. He's closer to Sheila and Eric's age than their parent's, but he's a young man who's already old in his attitudes.
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How is Gerald like a young version of Arthur?
He's shallow and stubborn.
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Why is Gerald marrying Sheila? What does he agree with Birling's actions on?
For business reasons. That Eva/Daisy had to be fired.
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Does Gerald learn anything? Explain
No - when he's found out to have ditched Daisy/Eva, he doesn't seem to guilty, and at the end of the play he thinks his engagement is back on. "Everything's all right now, Sheila"
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What is Priestley's criticism of the upper class suggesting?
That they're set in their own ways and therefore unlikely to change.
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What does the fact Gerald is of the younger generation but remains unchanged suggest?
That a more caring future isn't inevitable - people can choose whether to change or not.
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

Which class do the older generation represent? (Hint - not the middle class!)

Back

The ruling class.

Card 3

Front

What does Priestley do by questioning the older generation's old-fashioned personal views?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

What is there a chance for because the younger generation learn their lesson?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

What has happened between the younger and older generation by the end of the play?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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