Education - Which Sociologists Said What?

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  • Created by: Gustyte
  • Created on: 13-01-18 22:19
Role of Education - Functionalism - DURKHEIM
It is important that individuals feel that they are a part of something. (Solidarity) Education passes on societies core values through lessons such as PSHE , Citizenship and the Hidden Curriculum. This is so that we can work on value consensus.
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Role of Education - Functionalism - PARSONS
To form a bridge from particularistic and universalistic standards. Setting rules and values which apply to all members making them comparable.
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Role of Education - Functionalism - SCHUTZ
Provides human capital (increases the value to the employer), the expansion of schooling and higher education is necessary. Vocational training, there is an emphasis on preparing individuals for the world of work.
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Role of Education - Functionalism - DAVIS & MOORE
Role Allocation ( allocating pupils to their future roles by assessing abilities via exams). Inequality is necessary so that the most talented people take the most important jobs. We live in a meritocratic society. Everyone has equality of ed. opp.
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Role of Education - New Right - CHUBB & MOE
Education should operate like a supermarket, so they are forced to improve quality and compete for customers. Marketisation improves quality and efficiency. Current system flawed.
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Differential Attainment - External Class - DOUGLAS
Educational success and failure is dependant on the degree of parental encouragement, expectation, interest and involvement in their child's education. (Middle class have more than Working Class)
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Differential Attainment - External Class - BERNSTEIN
There are two types of language that is used, elaborated and restricted code. The MC familiarity of the elaborated code gives them a better chance of success in education.
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Differential Attainment - External Class - REAY
Exaggeration of the differences and downplay of the similarities (MC/WC) between attitudes and beliefs. WC have material constraints preventing parents attending meetings. WC have a lack of self-confidence so are less assertive.
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Differential Attainment - External Class - CASSEN & KINGDON
We are ignoring the role of the school. Some teachers may label WC children as ' born to fail' and therefore neglecting their needs leading to the self-fulfilling prophecy.
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Differential Attainment - External Class - KEDDIE
There is a need for schools to change. Education is mainly based around white MC culture hence creating a disadvantage for others of different backgrounds.
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Differential Attainment - External Class - Material Deprivation - MARILYN HOWARD
Young people from poorer homes have lower intakes of energy, vitamins and minerals . This results in more absences (illness) and difficulties in concentrating
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Differential Attainment - External Class - Material Deprivation - RICHARD WILKINSON
The lower the social class the higher the rate of hyperactivity, anxiety and conduct disorders. All of which can have negative effect on the child's education.
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Differential Attainment - External Class - Material Deprivation - BLANDIN & MACHIN
Children from low income families were more likely to engage in externalising behaviour. (Fighting and temper tantrums) Likely to disrupt their schooling.
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Differential Attainment - External Class - Material Deprivation - DAVID BULL
'The costs of free schooling' the lack of financial support means that children from poorer backgrounds have to do without equipment.
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Differential Attainment - External Class - Material Deprivation - CALLENDAR & JACKSON
The working class are more debt averse. There are more costs than benefits in going to university.. They are also more likely to receive less financial support.
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Differential Attainment - External Class - PIERRE BOURDIEU
Both cultural and material factors contribute to educational achievement and are not separate but interrelated. There are 3 types of capital - educational, cultural and economic
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Differential Attainment - External Gender - BROWNE & ROSS
Gender domains are formed by early socialisation.
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Differential Attainment - External Gender - NORMAN
Girls and boys are dressed differently and encouraged to play with different toys directing them to different activities (boys are more active = PE).
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Differential Attainment - External Gender - REAY
For some WC girls, who have limited job opportunities, being a part of a couple brings status.
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Differential Attainment - External Gender - BIGGART
Some WC girls who face uncertainty in the job market see motherhood as the only viable option for the future, so there is no point in working hard at school.
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Differential Attainment - External Gender - FRANCIS
The development of the feminine identity pushes girls to work harder, increased employment.
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Differential Attainment - External Gender - MITSOS &BROWNE
The decline in male employment opportunities has led to an 'identity crisis for men'. Many boys believe there is little prospect of getting a proper job. Undermining their motivation and self-esteem so they give up on qualifications.
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Differential Attainment - External Gender - JESSICA RINGROSE (Feminist)
Moral panic reflects a fear that underachieving boys will grow up to be part of the dangerous, unemployable underclass that threatens social stability.
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Educational Policy - Parentocracy - BROWN
The 'parent power' giving the rights and choice of school to the parents. However, this is heavily dependant and the wealth and wishes of the parents.
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Educational Policy - ERA - Marketisation - MIRIAM DAVID
Parentocracy, encourages the diversity among schools and gives parents more choice and leads to an increase in standards.
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Educational Policy - ERA - Marketisation - BALL & WHITTY
Marketisation policies such as exam league tables reproduce class inequalities by creating inequalities between schools.
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Educational Policy - ERA - Marketisation - WILL BARTLETT
Cream-skimming - good schools are more selective and are able to choose their 'customers' (mainly MC). Silt-shifting - good schools can avoid taking less able pupils who are likely to get poor results and damage the league position.
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Educational Policy - ERA - Marketisation -GERWITZ
Parental choice, 3 types of choosers - privileged skilled, disconnected- local and semi-skilled. In practice MC parents possess the cultural and economic capital and hence have more choice.
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Educational Policy - New Labour - MELISSA BENN
New labour paradox, there is a contradiction in the policies between tackling inequality and commitment to marketisation. EG/ EMA's to encourage poor entering HE, they introduced tuition fees
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Educational Policy - EMA - WHITTY
The EMA's did tackle inequality amongst the WC however, it was merely cosmetic due to the high costs of university fees acting as a deterrent.
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

To form a bridge from particularistic and universalistic standards. Setting rules and values which apply to all members making them comparable.

Back

Role of Education - Functionalism - PARSONS

Card 3

Front

Provides human capital (increases the value to the employer), the expansion of schooling and higher education is necessary. Vocational training, there is an emphasis on preparing individuals for the world of work.

Back

Preview of the back of card 3

Card 4

Front

Role Allocation ( allocating pupils to their future roles by assessing abilities via exams). Inequality is necessary so that the most talented people take the most important jobs. We live in a meritocratic society. Everyone has equality of ed. opp.

Back

Preview of the back of card 4

Card 5

Front

Education should operate like a supermarket, so they are forced to improve quality and compete for customers. Marketisation improves quality and efficiency. Current system flawed.

Back

Preview of the back of card 5
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