Cultural Variations in Attachment

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What did Tronick et al study?
An African tribe (Efe) from Zaire who live in extended family groups - infants looked after and breast fed by various mothers but slept with own at night - after six months still showed primary attachment
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What did Fox study?
Infants being raised for in communal children's homes by metaplot nurses - attachment tested in strange situation, shwing equal attachment apart from in reunion stage where more enthusiastic to see mother = still primary attachment figure
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Who studied cross cultural differences?
Grossmann and Grossmann
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What did Grossmann and Grossmann find?
Germaninfants tend to be insecurely attached - due to different upbringing of keeping interpersonal distance between child and parent so do not engage in proximity-seeking behaviours in strange situation
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What can you conclude from all these studies?
Despite cultural variations in infant care - strongest attachment is still formed with primary care giver (mother)
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What did Ijzendoorn and Kroonenberg find from a meta-analysys of 6000 strange situations across countries?
Found little variation - most abundant was secure attachmen, the reset differed little apart from very little avoidant in Japan and Israil
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What did Fox study?

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Infants being raised for in communal children's homes by metaplot nurses - attachment tested in strange situation, shwing equal attachment apart from in reunion stage where more enthusiastic to see mother = still primary attachment figure

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Who studied cross cultural differences?

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What did Grossmann and Grossmann find?

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What can you conclude from all these studies?

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