How far do the sources suggest that in the Jackson Marriage Case of 1891, it was Mr Jackson who had ‘right upon his side’ [20 Marks]

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Part A Exam Question: How far do the sources suggest that in the Jackson Marriage Case of 1891, it was Mr Jackson who had ‘right upon his side’ [20 Marks]

 

The Jackson case of 1891 caused a controversy that swept across England, leading to the reinforcement of the Jackson case as a case law, and was ultimately used by courts in future cases upon which to make a decision.

 

One source that gives supporting examples of this statement is source 12, in which it states this crime was essentially a ‘Romantic Abduction’. This implies that Mr Jackson locking up of his wife was simply an act of love, and backed up by the statement allegedly given by Mrs Jackson in source 10, that she did not feel any ‘ill effects’ and that Mr Jackson had been ‘most kind and considerate...I have not complained to him or anyone.’, suggesting that Mr Jackson had not in any way caused distress to his wife, and if anything portrayed him throughout such sources from newspapers, as an innocent, justified man essentially. However, the validity of these sources holding Mr Jackson on a somewhat moral pedestal is something different entirely. Whereas source 12 adds weight to the argument – it being a more factual piece written 6 months following the case, and included little or no emotion – source 10 lessens the weight of the argument, as the simple idea Mrs Jackson was being held captive at the time of interview suggests that she would have been influenced to lie due to her current circumstances. The article also being from a Manchester newspaper could again contribute to lessening the weight of the argument that Mr Jackson was right, as being a newspaper, it has a purpose to although inform, similarly entertain – and therefore the story or statement given here by Mrs

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