Causes of WW1: The Schlieffen Plan vs. The Assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand

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  • Created by: Fiona S
  • Created on: 12-02-15 21:04

The Schlieffen Plan

  • The plan was to, originally, surround Paris by surprise and have France surrender in six weeks by going through neutral Holland and Belgium.
  • Then they would attack Russia on the Eastern frontier because they thought Russia would take a long time to mobilise their army.
  • This plan was thought up in 1905 by the head of the German army, von Schlieffen, thinking the French would not expect an attack from the north, but through Alsace-Lorraine where they share a border
  • They expected that they had time to defeat France and then turn their army around and attack Russia.

Why did it fail?

  • They changed the plan after von Schlieffen died in 1912.
  • Instead, they only went through Belgium and didn't go around Paris or reach Paris at all
  • The Russians had mobilised their army quicker than they had…


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