CASE STUDY- Mumbai + Dharavi

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MUMBAI HAS SOME OF THE HIGHEST LAND VALUES IN THE WORLD

URBANISATION

  • 16th century- 7 marshy island + fishing village
  • 18th century- British trading port. City started growing after the cotton gorwing areas of the mainland connected by rail 
  • Supply cotton to Britain stimulated Mumbai's economy 
  • 1888- Growth of texile production made it India's largest commercial centre
  • Became more industrial diverse attracting migrant workers
  • 1947- Independance + growth of port + offshore oil led to more public sector activity, financial services and international trade
  • 20th century- big expansion due to rural to urban migration as people sought work 

SUBURBANISATION

  • CBD situated at the south end of the island so growth proceeds north along traffic corridors (ribbon effect) 
  • Varied population with different religions and educational backgrounds
  • Commuting in the CBD + suburbs 
  • Rural migrants find adequate work and cannot afford in the city centre so locate on the periphery
  • Slums on periphery (biggest one in the world is Dharavi) 

DHARAVI

  • High density
  • Make shift housing
  • Poor sanitation
  • Open sewage
  • Tocix materials
  • Rationed water
  • Lack of public toilets
  • Disease
  • Informal sector and black market
  • Organised around central communities so that familes live close together and factories are integrated between houses

REGENERATION

  • Redvelelopment of peripheral slums to adress the low living conditions…

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