Aristotle: eudemonia

HideShow resource information
  • Created by: Lottie
  • Created on: 31-05-12 13:15

 

Aristotle: eudemonia

This extract is from Book 1 of Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics, about eudemonia. Key information has been highlighted in bold. The numbers in brackets refer to the explanatory notes below.

For this reason also the question is asked, whether happiness is to be acquired by learning or by habituation or some other sort of training, or comes in virtue of some divine providence or again by chance. Now if there is any gift of the gods to men, it is reasonable that happiness should be god-given, and most surely god-given of all human things inasmuch as it is the best. But this question would perhaps be more appropriate to another inquiry; happiness seems, however, even if it is not god-sent but comes as a result of virtue and some process of learning or training, to be among the most godlike things; for that which is the prize and end of virtue seems to be the best thing in the world, and something godlike and blessed. (1)

It will also on this view be very generally shared; for all who are not maimed as regards their potentiality for virtue may win it by a certain kind of study and care. But if it is better to be happy thus than by chance, it is reasonable that the facts should be so, since everything

Comments

No comments have yet been made

Similar Ethics resources:

See all Ethics resources »See all resources »