A2 OCR Crime & Deviance - Gender & Crime

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  • Created by: Kim
  • Created on: 09-06-14 21:37

Gender & Crime

According to Official Crime Statistics, men statistically commit far more crime than women, however, it is possible that the OCS (Official Crime Statistics), being a social construction, over-police the male population therefore tampering with the truth behind the figures they produce.

Evidence; Chivalry Thesis - there is distinct sexism into the criminal justice system from the male-dominated courts and police - women are treated much more leniently than men as a result.

Women are half as likely as men to be imprisoned for the same offences, however women are becoming seemingly more deviant; or perhaps, they are losing the advantages they once had.

Carlen - women commit less crime becuase the 4 controls (mentioned by Hirschi; Commitment, Attachment, Belief & Involvement) act more upon them than they do on men.

Smart & Oakley - men are socialised to be aggressive, whilst women are socialised to be caring - its part of nature that women do not commit as much crime taught to girls through the process of socialisation through the primary agent of socialisation (family) taught by maniuplation & canalisation whereby gendered toys and phrases are used to teach us the gender roles to become part an effective part of society later in life.

However, there are sure signs suggesting that over the years, women have become more criminal. They feature far more in crimes such as shoplifting than before.

Walklate - prostitution and shoplifting is fueled by the females economic need.

Evidence; Feminisation of poverty over the last 20 years accounts for women's higher economical need. However, Lea & Young point out that individuals are actualy far more prosperous today than before, but the media has made us more aware of our deprivation compared to others - perhaps its the desire for economic success rather…

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