Psychology - How do we see our world

The structure of the eye is that light that is reflected from an object enters the eye and creates an image on the retina. The retina is made up of rods and cones, rods are sensitive to light and see in black and white. Rods are situated on the outside of the eyes. Cones are in the middle of the eye and are less sensitive but are responsible for picking up colours.

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  • Created by: SimranS
  • Created on: 08-02-15 15:25

Retina

The retina is sensitive to light and we see things by the light that is reflected off an object, entering our eyes and projecting an image on the retina. The retina is made up of rods and cones, these are light sensitive cells. Rods are very sensitive to light and are situated on the outside corners of the retina; rods work in black and white. Cones however are found in the middle of the eye and whilst they are not very sensitive to light, they are responsible for picking up colour.

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Optic chiasma

Information from the retina travels along the optic nerve to the brain, the informatin goes to both sides of the brain so both paths  eventually cross over. This spot is called the optic chaisma. The optic nerves cross the optic chiasma to opposite sides of the brain and they enter a part of the brain called the visual cortex.

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