Poetry- Relationships

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  • Created by: Kaiaapple
  • Created on: 17-02-15 20:47

In Paris with You

Theme: Love on the rebound, desperate love.

Form: 5 stanzas, iambic pentameter. Indented stanza to show change of tone. Insistent rhythm helped along by rhyme.

Structure: 1st stanza speaker is in Paris with new love. 2nd hurt by previous love and can't talk of it. 3rd doesnt want to go to tourist sites, wants to find out about eachother instead. 4th passionate undertone.

Language: colloquial humorous, looks at love light heartedly, reflective, questioning. Regular insistent rhythm. Use of rhyme continues light hearted approach to love. Effects of a previous relationship gone wrong, has a new relationship.

Iambic pentameter is used- Shakespeare used it to present true love. This poem isn't about true love.

New love cannot be true love. 

1 of 7

Hurt

In Paris with You

City of love + romance. One person, vague.

"Don't talk to me of love. I've had an earful

And I get tearful when I've downed a drink or two.

I'm one of your talking wounded.

I'm a hostage. I'm maroonded.

But I'm in Paris with you."

Starts negative vibe within poem. Suggests that poet will be anti love. Trying to appeal to new loves pity. Might be a bit tipsy. Image of breakup.  Warlike images, overdramatic. Abandoned, stranded, shows self pity. He feels trapped in a relationship, too controlling, constricted. Present, staying in the moment, trying to forget about hurt and focus on the now. 

2 of 7

Anger

"Yes I'm angry at the way I've been bamboozled

And resentful at the mess I've been through.

I admit I'm on the rebound

And I don't care where are we bound.

I'm in Paris with you."

Coming across as negative character. Comic words + treatment of serious topic. Bundled into somehwere/something- the new relationship. Admition, no one wants to be someones rebound. Together, one thing but two people. Emphasised by italics-new.  Awkward wording, doesn't really care what path this new relationship takes. Present, together, now- reminder.

3 of 7

Change of tone

"Do you mind if we do not go to the Louvre,

If we say sod off to sodding Notre Dame,

If we skip the Champs Elysees

And remain here in this sleazy

Old hotel room

Doing this and that

To what and whom

Learning who you are,

Learning what I am."

Indented stanza-Change iof tone. Rejecting most famous landmarks in this city of lovers emphasises that it is not a traditional love poem. Undermines true love. Realistic and grim view of new love-sexual relationship, serious or just a fling? Careless, vague language. Sexual undertones. Forming new relationship, seeing if it will work, romantic, self absorbed, using other person to find out about himself, wanting pity, lost who he is, acceptance of new relationship?

4 of 7

New love?

"Don't talk to me of love. Let's talk of Paris,

The little bit of Paris in our view.

There's that crack across the cieling

And the hotel walls are peeling

And I'm in Paris with you."

Wants to avoid subject. Romantic. Lying on their backs, intimate. Crack-division in their relationship? Dingy, dark, sleazy hotel, reflects his state of mind or the relationship status. Reminder.

5 of 7

Starting new relationship

"Don't talk to me of love. Let's talk of Paris.

I'm in Paris with the slightest thing you do.

I'm in Paris with your eyes, your mouth,

I'm in Paris with... all points south.

Am I embarrasing you?

I'm in Paris with you."

Romantic, sexual undertone. Shows genuine attraction. Sexual, suggests what he wants, not saying it outloud, unsure of their reaction. Doesn't know the person so well so they don't know if it is okay. Admition, that they are are in the city of love and thats what they should do. Constantreminder, trying to suggest that they are in the city of love so they should make love. Focusing on the present. 

6 of 7

Compare

To His Coy Mistress- life is short, so persue your desires.

Hour- about the intensity of new love.

7 of 7

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